How to Get the Most out of Your BMW’s Engine

BMW has always been known for powerful, high-quality engines, but no engine will keep running forever without a bit of maintenance and some TLC. What do you need to do to get the most of out of your new or new-to-you BMW engine?

Change Your Oil

Changing your oil is one of the most important things you can do to keep your engine running smoothly for as long as possible. You don’t need to change it every three months or 3,000 miles, though — that’s a sales gimmick to make you spend more money than necessary.

You might hear a rumor that you can go 15,000 miles between oil changes for a BMW, but this isn’t true either. While newer models can go up to 10,000 miles between changes, the manufacturer recommends an intermediate oil change somewhere in the middle to make sure everything is running smoothly. Plan on changing your oil every 7,500 miles or so.

Invest in Good Engine Treatments

A good engine treatment can give your oil an edge and help you get the most out of your engine.  Depending on the formula to the individual treatment, it can improve the lubrication of your engine oil, protect your moving parts from dirt and engine debris and even improve gas mileage.

It is important to note that not all engine treatments are created equal and there are tons of them on the market right now. Most auto parts stores have an entire wall dedicated just to engine treatments, so do your research to find out which treatment will work the best for your individual engine needs.

Don’t Buy Cheap Filters

When it comes to filters, you definitely get what you pay for.  Cheap filters clog quickly and have to be replaced more often, which can bog down your engine and, if left in place too long, potentially cause damage.

We’re not saying you have to drop a ton of money on a high-end reusable K&N filter or anything — just don’t buy the cheapest filters on the shelf, because you’ll end up regretting it. Think of car filters as you would shoes: you can spend $100 on a pair of sneakers that will last you a year or you can spend twenty bucks five times on cheap sneakers that hurt your feet and wear out after a month or two.

The same thing applies to filters.

Pick a Specialist, Not Your Neighborhood Mechanic

One of the best things you can do for your BMW is to drive right past your neighborhood mechanic and instead head to a local BMW specialist. Not only will they have a better idea of the kind of treatment your BMW needs, but they’ll also have easier access to the replacement parts and equipment you need to ensure your car keeps running for years to come.

A BMW is a good car to invest in if you want something that will see you through many years of daily driving — but no car can survive if you don’t take care of it. Keep these tips in mind to get the most out of your BMW engine.

A BMW Blitz at the Monterey Motorsports Reunion

All photos by Daniel Blodgett and Mitchell Weitzman

Another year, another Monterey Car Week. Like a good Scotch, it never gets old. Besides the usual car shows that engulf the Monterey Peninsula, there is one jewel that seems to grow in popularity each year: The Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion. What is it? Historic racing at its very finest. All the famous racing cars you read about or see pictures and videos of head to Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca to prove they’re not just museum pieces. Sure, some do cruise in their prized collectibles, but some truly are there to race.

BMW is built upon its storied racing heritage, so of course a legion of Bavarian bombers take to the Corkscrew. We’re talking 2002’s, CSLs, and M1 Procars. These are simply the best of the best. Seeing them in person, to be brutally frank, is SO much better than a YouTube video. Compressed audio and even HD can’t come close to capturing the magic of one of these beasts. Here in person, the sound alone of the screaming ‘sixes raises hairs all over.

Competing with the BMW’s on track are period-correct models from Porsche, Ferrari, and even Chevrolet. And this is only one small group out of the dozen that runs over the weekend; That’s how much the Monterey Motorsports Reunion has to offer. The classes are diverse enough that, when coupled with short 30 minutes races, boredom is literally impossible.

The BMW CCA has a large presence as well, with a lavish camp overlooking turns 4 and 5. The car corral is equally impressive, with examples of the most desirable BMWs on display. Truly a show on its own.

Almost as good as the racing itself is the paddock. Here, no special passes are needed to wander through the garages and racing cars while they’re being prepped. It’s a brilliant chance to see all the legendary cars up close. Owners and drivers are of the utmost friendly nature too. Vendors are out in full-force too with racing memorabilia and apparel. I even bumped into sportscar superstar Marino Franchitti and his wife Holly, a racer of vintage cars herself, at the Nicolas Hunziker tent.

The facilities at Laguna Seca are world-class, being very clean and the access to almost any part of the circuit is tremendous. With it came perfect weather too, settling at about 70 degrees on a sunny, August day. Further highlights included seeing Mika Hakkinen race Emerson Fittipaldi’s McLaren M23 for demonstration laps and Mazda’s shrieking 767B.

The best part, though, is the price. While events like the Concours D’elegance, Italiano, and Quail run hundreds of dollars, the Historic’s are only double-digits. How’s that for bang for your buck? And this is more exciting. The racing resumes next year August 23-26.

Up Close with the BMW 8-Series Concept at the Quail

As you might have seen in a previous post, I recently attended the Quail, a Motorsports Gathering, part of the legendary Monterey Car Week. There was everything a car guy could hope for: cars of all vintage, food, music, booze, beautiful people, and celebrities. It was Christmas morning and I felt like I was 8 again.

But I want to talk more about a very special car present at the Quail: the new 8-Series concept. We’ve all seen the press release photos. You know, the ones with perfect lighting and shadows. However, the real test is to see how it is in real life. I thought the concept, personally, looked great. In short, the new 8er makes the outgoing 6-series look pedestrian and mercilessly mundane. What was a thoroughly handsome car has now become slightly boring.

So, what has changed about the look? The new 8 is a much more aggressive car. The stance appears far more purposeful, and while the 6 was just round, the 8 manages to be both round and sharp together. Lovely creases form the tapered front and rear sections with a more swooping shape to the side. The proportions and roofline are spot-on. There are slits and slats abundant all around, up front, in the rear, and even the sides. I particularly like the slim, slit-like tail lights. In contrast to the current crop of BMW tail lights which feature a large housing around LED lights, this is just the LED strip itself. I bet the view following the 8 will be mega.

While I really do like the car and see it as an improvement over the 6, I do have a few things I don’t like. Mainly, the grille. Talking to Jonny Lieberman from Motor Trend, he said it best, describing it as, “Bitey.” It does give the impression it’s trying to swallow you, and not in a good way. Just something about it is off, the styling of the trademark kidney grilles are too pronounced and exaggerated.

Also, all those cool vents,  when peering inside I couldn’t help but notice the cheap looking plastic grilles inside. They were just dull black plastic. C’mon, BMW. Some carbon or gloss black grilles would be much better, and for how much the 8 will cost, it should be better.

Overall though, it is a good looking car. This is a concept, remember, so it could change slightly before the production model is ready. I’m also quite keen to see the inevitable M8 as well.

 

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