I Drove a Manual M4 Today, and it was Awesome

An M4 Competition, that is, the most powerful and focused real M4 you can buy today. I have had chances to drive multiple M3 and M4s, both competition and standard ‘base’ models (oh the horror, the horror of a base M4…), but never the opportunity of one with a clutch pedal. If you’ve read my stuff before you’ll already know I’m a fan of changing gear myself, rather than pulling a slim metal blade 1 centimeter. I’ve also always had reservations of the new M cars because of their turbocharging and lack of steering feel, but by the grace of his holiness the lord of clutch, it’s just better with a stick. An M3/4 always felt detached to me, but by putting an H-pattern next to you and a third pedal, the missing bonding element of driver and car has been remedied.

To be frank, the involvement is on another level. Now I can’t just rely on that prodigious wave of torque that the S55 twin-turbo provides, because now I have to make sure I’m in the right gear for it to make mayhem of the asphalt below. The satisfaction of riding out second gear and getting a smooth, yet quick 2-3 shift is deeply rewarding as well. And those heel-toe…oh wait, that’s right, you can’t. Well, you can, but what’s the point when it has software that automatically blips the throttle on downshifts. And I honestly have no idea how to turn this bit of programming off. I clicked into MDM mode and it still did it. I then turned off DSC completely and yes, it still did it. It makes normal driving easier and allows quicker downchanges, but I had trouble liking it.

Here’s an example: going down from 4th to 2nd, I put the clutch in and selected 2nd with my right hand, and as I’m used to on my E46, slowly let the clutch out to ensure smooth transition to the lower gear. Problem is, the car already blipped the throttle quite heavily, so instead of feeling the clutch grab and drag as I eased it out, it remained light with zero feel. Not an issue, just something to get used to. The quicker you changed down a gear, the better it works. Perhaps there’s a fuse for it…or a wire to snip.

Also, another slight grievance, the car in question had only 800 miles on it, but the gearshift was a bit clunky, with what felt like a diff thud on several upshifts, but I’m sure it’ll smooth out over time. The difference in shift quality between a M235i and 5,000 mile one assure me this. Never have I enjoyed driving a new M car as much. It even gave the engine more character, as the manual exposes turbo lag. It now becomes your responsibility to keep the engine in the sweet spot when you ask for it. And it’s by no means a chore. Changing gear is supposed to be fun, after all. You also feel the boost build more intensely. In second at 3k you can floor it and you think, “nothing, nothing, oh wait, I think it’s there, yes it’s-HOLY BLOODY MOTHER OF 21-YEAR-OLD SCOTCH!” I’ll say it again, in this case, lag is cool. It’s character.

What I really didn’t like though? I love the wheels of the competition package, and the marginal power boost, but damn is the ride stiff. Even in comfort on admittedly rough surface streets, the ride was medieval. Smooth roads are mostly fine, but with some surface breaks and chewed up tarmac, it’s tiring. Tradeoffs though are supreme steering reflexes and zero roll in the chassis. Everyday though, I don’t know if I could do it. Yet, those wheels though. But that ride…BUT THOSE WHEELS. It’s tough, I know. #1stWorldProblems.

I feel I may have got sidetracked with the purpose of this story. So again, back to the topic, I drove an M4 with a manual transmission and it was awesome. Adding back that lost ingredient fixes my largest gripe with the M4, and that was a lack of intimacy and connection. It’s the prescription for both symptoms. DCT is great; it’s fast, efficient, and easy, but I personally find it boring. And you can brag to people you drive a stick also. First thing I do when I see a cool car on the street? Walk up to the window and peer in to see if a gear lever resides inside. What can I say, I’m a romantic. Buy a manual and you’re ride will also probably be more valuable in the future as well. Just speculating. Save the manuals!

How to Prevent Rust on Your BMW

In the history of the automobile, more prime specimens have probably fallen victim to rust than any other single cause of death. Oxidization can be difficult to avoid if your car makes its home somewhere near water or where cold weather requires many miles of driving on salted roads, but you can take steps to prevent this car cancer from setting in.

BMWs aren’t known for having particularly thin skin, but they are as susceptible to rust as the average car, and as any bimmer owner will tell you, that’s not a good thing. They’re worth preserving, which is why you should follow these simple tips to ensure your BMW enjoys a long, rust-free life.

Seal Your Car’s Undercarriage

This is a job you can do on your own, provided you’ve got some elementary bodywork experience. You can pick up sealant at your local auto parts store, but getting beneath your ride and performing the application process safely is something that might require a professional. Make sure you’re up to the task, and if you don’t feel certain you can do it, get some help.

Keep It Clean

A clean BMW owner is a happy BMW owner and not just because your car will look better for it. Keeping imperfections and corrosive road grime off your paint will make sure your car doesn’t suffer from oxidization. All the more reason to stay up on those regular wash jobs! And once you get it clean, keep your car covered or, better yet, in a garage where it’s safe from the elements.

Treat Scratches and Chips

Paint is your best defense against oxidization, so rust begins to form where paint has worn down and bare metal is exposed to air, typically from salt corrosion. For this reason, it’s crucial you spot chips and scratches early and fill them or repaint to prevent corrosion. Rust forms quickly from these, and if you don’t know what to look for, you might not see the problem until rust is already there.

Invest in Paint Sealing

There was a time when you might have wanted to spend the extra cash, but these days, you can probably get a BMW from the factory with its paint sealed. The new stuff works, and if your car has clean paint you want to protect, applying a sealant is a great step towards doing that. The process only takes an afternoon but will keep your bimmer from rusting for years to come.

Protect Your Interior

Many BMWs come with factory floor mats that are made of soft carpet, which looks great but doesn’t defend well against the elements. If you didn’t spring for the all-weather upgrade but live in a place where salt and snow are part of your daily life, throw a set of protective rubber mats down. If you don’t, salt that works its way to your floor panels could be a silent killer.

The best way to fix a rust problem is to avoid it altogether. You don’t want to go down the perilous road of using Bondo on your BMW. Leave that for the pick-n-pull crowd to apply to old muscle cars. A few preventative steps now, and you’ll enjoy a shiny coat of paint as long as you have your car!

Alpina vs M … the battle of the performance super sedans

Many people ask… M versus Alpina.  BMW is releasing cars that seem to directly compete with each other.  Which would you rather have, an Alpina B6 versus a BMW M6?  Should you use BMW’s in-house performance division?  Or should you rely on an outside performance automaker to get your thrills in your four door super sedan?

The guys at MotorTrend paint a great picture explaining the difference between the two.

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