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Thread: Comprehensive Clutch/Flywheel DIY

  1. #1
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    Comprehensive Clutch/Flywheel DIY

    Warning: Picture Intensive

    The Pelican Parts one is a comprehensive DIY. However I'm making this in the hopes that people who have an M3 specific model can also refer to this for reference. I couldn't find one on Bimmerforums, so I decided to embark on making one as I was doing a clutch/flywheel job anyway. This DIY is split up into 4 parts: Exhaust Removal, Driveshaft Removal/CSB replacement, Transmission Removal and Reinstall. Feel free to skip to the appropriate sections as necessary for you. This is for an 11/97 build date M3. This was written to those who want to do a clutch change, but don't feel quite comfortable doing so.

    This job could easily be done over the weekend for the weekend warrior. If you have a car buddy, that'll help a lot as 2 brains are better than one. Not to mention muscle... My car had 164,101 miles when clutch was replaced. I could've probably stretched it to 175-180k based on pedal feel and engagement.

    Notes: The underside is really dirty, don't mind it. Those with stock Dual Mass Flywheels (DMF) - the flywheel is good for 2 clutch changes i.e. replace it on the 2nd clutch change. Although, as a guideline, do check the internal springs to see that they still have adequate tension...if not, replace. You can find my pictures here: http://s126.photobucket.com/albums/p87/kyozlk/Clutch/

    Just for fun, I weighed the assemblies for the stock and the new and they were:

    New:

    Sachs Pressure Plate - 11.44lbs
    New Organic Clutch - 2.75lbs
    New F1 Racing Flywheel - 14.69lbs

    Total = 28.88lbs

    Old:

    Sachs Pressure Plate - 11.75lbs
    Old Clutch - 2.44lbs
    Dual Mass Flywheel - 22.81lbs

    Total = 37lbs

    Applicable Part Numbers:

    Clutch/Flywheel Kit (F1 Racing Stage 1) (I used OEM TOB/Pilot Bearing)
    Throw Out Bearing 21512226729 (47.56)
    Pilot Bearing 11211720310 (10.56)
    6 Pressure Plate bolts 07119906045 (0.56x6)
    Center support bearing 26122227278 ($76.44)
    Cat Hanger Rubber 18301703634 (2.17x2)
    Cat Bolts 07119912524 (0.47x4)
    Cat Exhaust Nuts 11621711954 (0.31x4)
    Catback Hangers 18201401797 (15.70x2) (replace if sagging)
    Rear Main Seal 11142249533 (26.84) (if needed)
    Header to Cat nuts 18301737774 (0.74x6)
    Pivot Pin 21511223328 (0.99x1)
    Guibo 26112226527 (96.78) + Nuts 07129900047 (0.60x6)
    Transmission Mounts 22316771219 (10.97x2) (if needed, I didn't)
    Shifter bushing refresh kit ($83.75) -- Pelican Parts
    Dust Cover Plate 26111226553 (behind center support bearing)


    I sourced all of this from RMEuropean (Love them!) minus the Guibo+Nuts (forum member 3 years ago) and Shifter Bushing Kit (Pelican).

    Tools Needed:

    4x 6 Ton Jack Stands (http://www.amazon.com/Torin-T46002A-.../dp/B00026Z3DQ) Good buy for the price if you have Amazon Prime.
    Assorted 3 ton Jack Stands (not a priority)
    Floor Jacks
    Impact Gun with Assorted Sockets
    Metric Wrench Set (I have 7-18mm)
    Mapp/Propane Torch (For stuck nuts/bolts)
    3/8" Ratchet with sockets (I highly recommend 1/2" extensions for this)
    3/8" / 1/2" Breaker Bars (harbor freight)
    6" 3 Jaw Gear Puller (Harbor freight)
    Snap Ring Remover (I used Lisle 46000) for Center Support Bearing
    Floor Jack Handle or PVC Pipe (For installing Center Support Bearing)
    Pilot Bearing Removal Tool (MTN9001). Pilot bearing is 15mm inner diameter, MTN9001 is good 13-38mm.

    Commonly used metric sizes for this: 8 & 10mm (heatshielding), 12, 13 (exhaust/cat hanger), 15 (headers), 16 (4bolt ds+chassis cross bar), 18 (guibo), 19 (flywheel), 22 (Post-Cat O2 sensor), E10/E12/E14 External Torx (transmission) 6mm Allen (pressure plate).

    Preface:

    I thank my buddy Hova for providing support and the part numbers.

    As a preparation for starting, you'll want to jack up the car as high as you can go. For this purpose, I jacked my car up about 20" inches and was at a comfortable level to work underneath. It'd be even better if you could jack it up to about 22". For the 6T jack stands, maximum height was about 24". 22" allows ample room for a creeper underneath...unless you like crawling underneath. The higher, the better. I started off jacking up the car with 3 ton jack stands (maxed out at 17") to gain enough comfortable clearance before the car was jacked up and replaced with 6T jack stands. Check the jack stands to see that they're perfectly level and supporting the car before venturing underneath.





    We used wood blocks to elevate the lift height because the floor jack maxed out at 18 inches. If you choose this route, be absolutely certain that the wood block is level and flat.

    ----------Part 1: Exhaust System----------

    The first thing we attacked was the catback nuts and bolts. There are 4 of these. If these don't break loose, attack it with some Liquid Wrench/PB or torch it. Don't mind the cheap beer! Bolt size was 13mm, nut was 12mm.



    After that section is removed, feel free to use a jack stand to support that section if you're working alone. Move to the rear of the car and proceed to undo the muffler hanger bolts (12mm).





    The next part of this involves removing the header to downpipe/cat nuts.

    I suggest removing the straight cross bar (or x-brace) that attaches to the chassis first to get it out of the way:



    I had enough room to use an impact for the first 3 header nuts. The second set was a lot more involved as there is no space to impact the nuts off unless you have extensions. Luckily, one of the nuts was impact accessible.

    For this instance, a torch was involved because the 2 nuts were stuck. They were heated cherry red with a MAPP torch. Be absolutely sure your socket is seated on the nut, otherwise you will round them off and be SOL. I didn't have a problem with studs breaking as some do. Don't get burned.







    We have a little gratuity shot of me. Note, the jackstand supporting the section. Move towards the center of the car, and undo the cat hangers.

    The exhaust will now hang, support it with a jack stand so you have space to undo the O2 Sensors. I used a 22mm wrench for this.



    You'll need to undo the plastic housing that shields the O2 sensor cables.

    My Tip: There's a ton of nuts and bolts all over the place. After removing the heatshields , I just put the bolts back into the correct holes so I don't lose them kicking them around the garage floor.

    You'll expose your driveshaft.




    ----------Part 2: Driveshaft Removal----------

    Remove the bracket that the cat hanger bolts up to.



    I have a 4 bolt driveshaft rear end. There wasn't enough room so you'll need to use a box end 16mm. Since it was at night and we didn't finish the exhaust removal until 4am, I PBed all 4 bolts and left it alone for a few hours before breaking them loose.





    My center support bearing was flaking off old rubber. Guibo was in okay shape. Remove the heatshielding blocking the transmission support and then proceed to remove the transmission support.



    After this, you'll be able to undo the guibo nuts. An impact here would be great, otherwise you'll be having a grand ole time breaking those bolts loose. 18mm socket with 18mm box end wrench. Undo the center support bearing nuts, remove the driveshaft nuts, and proceed to remove the driveshaft from the car.




    ----------Part 2b: Center Support Bearing----------

    You can skip this if you're not replacing your center support bearing, however for those that are replacing it, make note of the white dots on your driveshaft as they need to line up otherwise you'll get some driveline vibration because it's not balanced anymore. If you don't have any marks, make your own. Mine were factory dotted.

    There is a locking ring that locks the two halves together. Undo them while it's still on the car if you can. Mine were able to be turned by hand. You may need a pipe wrench for this if it's on tight as it is an obnoxiously large size.



    I didn't take any pictures of this, but on the CSB, it will have a snap ring on it. Use your snap ring remover and remove the circlip. Having the correct tool here will save so much grief. Flip the halfshaft upside down and the dust cover should fall off.

    Not much documentation here on how to removal the center support bearing, or what to use. It was mentioned that hammering it off would work...didn't work for me. If you notice there'll be a dimple on the splines of the halfshaft. Use a 6" 3 jaw gear puller here to pull on the center support bearing rubber, cut it and remove the rubber surround. Use it again on the metal plate behind the bearing (it's a dust cover) and work it. Will come RIGHT off.

    Take note of the alignment of the bearing before pulling it off. Mark it if you need to.

    I replaced the metal dust cover that I destroyed (26111226553). Not sure if this was necessary.

    I used an arbor to tap it down on the shaft. I then used a floor jack handle to press the center support bearing back on. It was the exact same size as the inner race of the bearing. Replace the dust cover and the locking snap ring.






    ----------Part 3: Transmission Removal----------

    Now here's where things are going to get tricky. But good thing is, if you're dropping the transmission, now's the perfect time to install your SSK, Shifter Bushing Refresh Kit (Pelican), UUC's DSSR, and do your 5th gear and detent with the transmission out of the car.

    First off, go into your car, remove the shift knob (pull straight up), boot, and the foam. I would remove the selector rod if you haven't done so already. There are 2 circlips holding it together. Also remove the shift carrier from the car (the mechanism holding the shift lever above the selector rod). It's held on by the infamous bitch clip. Either break it or remove it. The bushing at the end of the shift carrier can be pried off with a flat head. Once that's done, all that's left is the transmission.

    Remove the slave cylinder from the car (2 13mm) and tie it somewhere so it's not dangling by the hose. I also wrote a note to myself.




    Now here's the hard part. There are 3 E-Torx sizes used: E10, E12, E14. There are 3 E10s at the bottom of the transmission. The 2 large bolts on both sides after the small ones are E14. In the upper left corner, you have the starter, which are 2 E12s. There is one small hex bolt around the headers. The top most bolt (I call it the bitch bolt) is an E14. If you have a creeper here, this'll be your friend as it elevates you off the ground and makes it easier to search for the bolts. All together you should have 10 bolts when said and done. 4x E14s, 3x E10s, 2x E12s, 1x 10mm. I would disconnect your battery here as you're messing with your starter.



    Be careful with the top bitch bolt. Make sure you fully engage it otherwise you will strip it like I did. Use 1/2" extensions for this. I used a combination of 15", 10", and 5" extensions to reach the top bolt with a 1/2" breaker bar. You'll be able to feel all the top bolts on the driver side of the transmission with your left hand. I made absolutely sure that the E-Torx sockets were fully on the bolts before breaking them loose.



    Once you count 10 bolts, it's time to pry and wiggle out your transmission. I used a flat head to wedge it and slowly move it off the car. This will be a pain, but it will gradually slide out. Support it well with a floor jack or a jack stand. It weighs a ton. 80lbs?

    You'll get access to the pressure plate. There are 6x 6mm Allen bolts. I managed to break apart 4 of them loose with a 1/2" breaker bar. I sprayed copious amounts of PB before having at it. The last 2 bolts did not come out, so I used a torch.

    Slowly start prying the pressure plate off. The clutch will fall and reveal the flywheel. There are 8x 19mm bolts. They should come off easily with an impact. If you're just replacing the clutch, I would ignore the flywheel.

    Take your trusty pilot bearing puller and slowly start pulling out the bearing. I used the Mountain MTN9001 puller with great success.



    Clean the hole and then tap the new bearing in with a 24mm deep socket. There is a groove in the hole that will stop the bearing from moving in further. Replace the rear main seal at this point if you need to.

    Tend to your clutch fork, pivot pin and throwout bearing. I also refreshed my shifter bushings at this time following Pelican Parts's DIY: http://pelicanparts.com/bmw/techarti...t_Bushings.htm

    It was very straightforward.

    My old clutch with 164k miles on it. I could've probably lasted another 10k miles. It wasn't slipping at all and held just fine...just the engagement point was bad:



    My new one:



    You're almost done.

    ----------Part 4: Transmission Reinstall----------

    There's not much else to say here but mating everything back. If you removed the flywheel, there will be a dowel that will align the flywheel back. It only goes in one direction. Torque the flywheel bolts to 77ft-lbs with red loctite. To prevent the flywheel from moving, I used a derivative of Pelican Parts's trick with a plate. This involved an E10 bolt, and an old pressure plate bolt.



    Install the clutch with the alignment tool, making sure you have the clutch in the right direction. You don't want to pull it apart again do you?



    Attach the pressure plate. Evenly thread the 6 pressure plate bolts as if you were tightening a wheel so that it mates evenly. Torque these guys to 18ft-lbs.

    Now it's all a matter of mating the transmission back here. This was tricky. I had to use an engine hoist to lower the rear of the engine so that I could slide the transmission on. You may not have to. Once you wiggle it back on, start threading bolts and slowly tightening them. The starter is a tricky one, since you'll need to align it with the dowel on the transmission. I threaded both E12s in here little by little, trying to align it with the dowel before tightening it down all the way.

    Torque the E10s to 16ft-lbs, the E12s to 32ft-lbs, and the E14s to 53ft-lbs. BE ABSOLUTELY SURE THE SOCKETS ARE FLUSH ON THE BOLTS BEFORE TORQUING. You can feel the bolt locations and the socket. If you can, have someone torque the bolts down while you hold onto the socket+extension. Install the slave cylinder.

    Install the shift carrier, taking note of proper orientation of the lever (kink towards front of the car). Install selector rod with it bent upwards otherwise you will get major vibrations in the shifter in 2nd gear (ask me how I know). Circlips should be pointing to passenger side. Install transmission support to chassis and torque it down to 16ft-lbs. Transmission mounts should be threaded hand tight and then 1/4" to 1/2" turn, or 16ft-lbs. I wouldn't tighten poly mounts that much.

    Thread on the 4 bolt driveshaft section. Attach your guibo with the correct orientation of the arrows pointing to the appropriate flanges. I alternated bolts with the arrow pointing to the flange, followed by the nut. Bolt up the center support bearing. After you torque down the guibo to 85ft-lbs, tighten the nuts suspending the center support bearing and preload the bearing by moving it forward (towards the front of the car) 4-6mm before finally tightening it down.

    Tighten the 4x 16mm nuts to the driveshaft. Torque spec for this guy is either 44ft-lbs, or 59ft-lbs, but I couldn't see how you'd be able to torque it. Proceed to reinstall heatshielding. Reinstall your exhaust section with O2 sensors with the new copper nuts and hangers.

    Hopefully, your car should fire right up! Break in period is 500 miles // 800-1000 shifts. Stop and go city driving or light traffic. You may need to bleed your hydraulics if shifting is hard to get into first/2nd. Or, shift into 2nd then 1st.

    Go out and have some fun!


    Last edited by desynch; 08-23-2011 at 01:42 PM.


  2. #2
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    "Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
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  3. #3
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    amazing write up!! I just had someone do this for me or else I would use this guide to attack it myself. Any chance you doing a e46 323 in the near future?? haha
    '98 M3 5spd - '03 540it 6spd M-Sport

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by QtheGenius View Post
    amazing write up!! I just had someone do this for me or else I would use this guide to attack it myself. Any chance you doing a e46 323 in the near future?? haha
    It is almost the same.
    "Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
    -Dr. Seuss
    DIY BMW Tools. Charlie For President

  5. #5
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    A few of my friends asked me after I did it...would you do it again?

    I thought long and hard about it...I could probably get everything done in a weekend or a day, even. But I would say, hell no. Unless you were my brother or a really close friend. I asked my neighbors down the street who dropped his tranny 4 times if he would help me for dinner and beer. They were like..."No. You'll see why." Sure did, even though everything went smoothly.

    I wrote this little guy because there wasn't an M3 DIY that walked you through step by step that you could follow on Bimmerforums. Basically you could take this and follow my footsteps. I just hope that this helps everyone who wants to try.


  6. #6
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    thanks for the writeup, pretty damn thorough
    -Rich-


  7. #7
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    I just did this last weekend. I didn't remove the drive shaft or exhaust though. I figured if I could do it without, then I wouldn't have to worry about breaking the exhaust manifold bolts. Now that I have done it once, a second time would be faster. Reaching the top bolt was not fun. I did remove my intake as the starter dowel was sticking. (And I wanted to replace hoses etc there anyway.)
    Times like this is when I really start to look at a car lift!

  8. #8
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    how did you drop the trans without removing the Driveshaft?

  9. #9
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    great write up OP thanks! Sticky please...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by das borgen View Post
    how did you drop the trans without removing the Driveshaft?
    You can just unbolt the guibo and the CSB. The driveshaft can stay attached to the diff, and just bend away.
    "Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
    -Dr. Seuss
    DIY BMW Tools. Charlie For President

  11. #11
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    I would've posted more pictures as they were relevant, but bf.c limited me to 30 so I had to cut down on the numbers. Even then, there's 27 pictures there?

    All in all, it wasn't a bad job. Just takes a while. Thank god I'm not getting any oil leaks after the RMS job. Or ones visible at least...


  12. #12
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    Great writeup, thanks.
    M50 * Bilstein PSS9 * UUC Sway's * PFlex LCABs/RTABs * TMS Delrin/Alum Diff Bushings * X-Brace * Stoptech SS Brake lines * CDV delete * DEPO with 55W 5000K HID's * 35W 5000K HID fogs
    Stock dyno: 201.7rwhp SAE corrected

  13. #13
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    Nice writeup. For future reference-- don't use red loctite on the flywheel bolts. They are supposed to have green loctite [for sealing]. Blue is ok, red is overkill.

  14. #14
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    I just removed the front bolts from the guibo and slid the drive shaft back far enough so the center guide was unhooked. Then I pulled it up close to the top of the drive shaft tunnel. I did remove the guibo when I went to reinstall the trans as I thought I would need extra clearance. Actually pulling the drive shaft out to normal length was a bit of trouble since I couldn't get anything to pry it out.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by rThor View Post
    Nice writeup. For future reference-- don't use red loctite on the flywheel bolts. They are supposed to have green loctite [for sealing]. Blue is ok, red is overkill.
    I thought so too, but that's what I've seen people use...so I went with it.

    Otherwise I would've gone with blue, but didn't have that. I noticed that the OEM flywheel bolts had what looked like yellow loctite.


  16. #16
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    ^^Yeah, the best approach is to buy new flywheel bolts as they come with he sealing compound already on the threads. I've done that on a few cars in the past.

  17. #17
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    680 miles later (I know it's not about miles) and it's broken in.

    It's been a while since I had a clutch that grabbed so hard and immediate! It's almost a challenge to shift smooth. Haha

    Recommended setup so far with the UUC cocktail. Red line 75w140ns and MT-90 and it quieted the chatter 90%.

    Only time will tell about longevity. Hope it's as good as OEM!
    Last edited by desynch; 08-30-2011 at 04:00 AM.


  18. #18
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    nice writeup. Pics are great. I'm abit uncertain with what I have. I have a used fidanza flywheel. It has a dowel inbeded in it. The motor I have also has a dowel on the flange the flywheel bolts on to.
    You think the dowel in the flywheel came off the previous motor?
    Is it needed for aftermarket flywheel?
    The flywheel bolt doesn't seem to fit with the dowel in place, unless I thread it through. Is that normal?

    thanks.

  19. #19
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    The dowel pin should rest on the motor side of the crank. It should not be on the flywheel. If the dowel pin is stuck on the flywheel, remove it. It's only there to help you position/fit the flywheel on, in the right way (it should only go on in one way).


  20. #20
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    I understand, but on my fidanza, it looks as if all the bolt holes are the same size. is that normal or should the flywheel come with one hole that is slightly larger?

    Also, if it turns out I didn't install it in the correct way, will it effect anything, besides an incorrect tdc when using the locking pin on the flywheel for timing the motor?

    thanks
    Last edited by BMWMPow3r; 10-21-2011 at 06:55 AM.

  21. #21
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    On my gripforce flywheel, there was one hole out of the 8 that was slightly enlarged to accommodate for the dowel for realignment. There was a groove in there, much like the picture with the pilot bearing (check my photobucket link if you haven't).
    Last edited by desynch; 10-21-2011 at 07:02 AM.


  22. #22
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    Good writeup - I usually drop the exhaust as one piece, no reason to take the catback off the midpipe if you have two people to manhandle it out.
    Chris
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  23. #23
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    awesome write-up, thanks! We will be doing this on a friend's car in the next month or so.
    -Chris

  24. #24
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    Bump! I'll need this soon.

    It's fantastic. Thanks so much!
    -Brandon

  25. #25
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    Done this once on mine, and once on a friends. Nice to have a thread like this though to refresh my memory once I install my new trans/ltwfly etc. Thanks a bunch. I'll be using a lift though for sure. I can't imagine doing all that on your back. Kudos for that!
    Last edited by wolffbimmer; 09-08-2013 at 04:51 PM.

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