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Thread: The Definitive Alignment Guide for your E36 M3

  1. #1
    joenationwide's Avatar
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    The Definitive Alignment Guide for your E36 M3

    This information applies to all E36 chassis (except the 318ti, and Z3/M Coupe as the rear suspension is from the E30).
    This information also applies to all E46 chassis cars.

    With so many posts asking about how to get the car aligned, what shops will align the car, what are the right specs, and why do I have tire wear.....I think we need a definitive alignment guide here.

    ***Update*** I've also put together a Definitive Suspension Guide for the E36 [M3] mainly geared towards novice/intermediate drivers wanting to upgrade their suspension for autox/track/DD.


    Q. What is the Stock E36 Alignment Adjustability?
    A: A stock E36 has the following adjustments - front toe, rear toe and rear camber.

    Q. Can only certain shops align my E36?
    A: There is nothing special about aligning your E36. Now, aligning your E36 per the manual maybe (because of adding weights to car). But the factory specs are terrible and you can forget about them.

    Q. Is it mandatory to add weights to the car when doing aligment?
    A. No. Even though the factory manual says to add weights in different locations, it is not absolutely necessary and will have a rather small effect on your alignment. You can add weights per the manual, or [recommended] you can add weight in the driver seat only to approximate your own weight, or you can add no weights [not recommended for best results].

    Q: Can I just take my car into a shop and ask to get it aligned?
    A: Only if you dont care about performance and tire wear.

    Q: What does that mean?
    A: If you bought an E36 M3, you obviously are looking for performance (unless you are #stancenation ). The BMW factory specs care nothing for performance or tire wear, only for safety and a low # of lawsuits. YES I AM SAYING THAT THE BMW FACTORY SPECS WILL NOT ONLY GIVE YOU POOR HANDLING AND PERFORMANCE, IT MAY ALSO WEAR OUT YOUR TIRES PREMATURELY.

    Q: Ok, so what is a good performance alignment for the street with good tire wear?
    A: Here are the specs: **NOTE: modified April 2013 for more conservative tire wear.**

    Front
    Camber: -2.0 to 2.5 deg (per side)
    Toe: 0.10 total toe
    (or 0.10 to 0.20 deg total toe in for mostly highway driving)

    Rear
    Camber: -1.5 to -2 deg (per side)
    Toe: 0.20 total toe in
    (IIRC this is 1/8" total toe in)

    Q: Can I get a good Performance Alignment for the Street with stock adjustments?
    A: NO! You can not get a good performance alignment for the street with a bone stock E36 M3, or even with a modified suspension, without front camber adjustment . You need some form of front camber adjustment that doesn't come stock.

    Q: Why do I need front camber adjustment?
    A: Here is the short explanation (long explanation explained later)...your M3 came from the factory with an alignment that gives the rear tires more grip than the front. This means, when you are going around a turn (say an off ramp) and you are at the limits (tires are squealing), your front tires are giving up and the car does not turn. That is much safer than if the rear tires gave up first and you are now spinning around. But when the front tires give up long before the rear tires, you are giving up a lot of cornering ability vs. a car that all 4 tires give up at the same time. And a car that wont turn feels like crap.

    Q: How do I change my front camber, and how much will it cost?
    A: Here are the options:

    Option #1: GOOD
    Install shims at lower strut mounts

    - ($0.10 to $25)
    - easy to install
    - gain about -1 deg. camber (about -2 deg total per side)
    - may have tire clearance issues with coilovers (wheel spacers can fix this if necessary)
    - need longer strut bolts
    - camber adjustable only by changing shim (and/or washer) thickness
    This was copied from Ligero's post:
    Camber change - shim thickness in mm
    0.5 deg - 1.16mm
    1.0 deg - 2.63mm
    1.5 deg - 4.00mm (just for reference, not recommended)
    2.0 deg - 5.44mm (just for reference, do not use)
    2.5 deg - 6.81mm (just for reference, do not use)
    - Link to Bimmerworld - Search for: E36 Front Camber Shim Kit bimmerworld sells a shim kit (aluminum sheet, not washer) that allows for more precision



    Option #2: BETTER
    Swapped 96+ M3 upper strut mounts

    - (free if you have a 96-99 M3, or about $75 used on bf.c)
    - relatively easy to install
    - gain about -2 deg. camber (about -2.75 deg total per side 95 M3s, 96+ M3s will gain more ~3.3 deg per side)
    - camber not adjustable (what you get is what you get)



    Option #3: BEST
    Vorshlag Camber/Caster plates

    - ($380 shipped IIRC)
    - relatively easy install
    - gain up to -3 deg. camber from stock (range of -1 to -4 deg total per side on avg [95s sometimes only up to -3.2])
    - lower stack height, allows for safer lowering of car (when using coilovers)
    - will likely lower front end 0.5"
    - 3 way caster adjustability
    - Link to Vorshlag Camber/Caster Plates

    Hanchey/Fair, you mind if I put this here?


    Q: How much negative camber is safe to run on the street?
    A: Up to -3 deg per side is safe to run on the street, but you will likely see some inner tire wear over time. (I used to run -3.4 deg camber per side on the street, with about 0.20 total toe OUT, and I got inner tire wear...about 2/32 more than the mid-outside of the tire). Now I run -2.5 deg camber per side and 0 toe on the street, and max out my camber plates negative at the track only.

    Q: Wont too much negative camber kill my tires?
    A: Negative camber does not kill tires. Negative camber plus excessive toe (in or out) causes inner tire wear. Toe (in or out) in effect forces the car to "drag" the tire down the road, where 0 toe lets the tire roll down the road. Make sense? Negative camber will cause the tire to roll on the inside of the tire, but negative camber plus excessive toe will drag the inside of the tire down the road causing bad inner tire wear.

    Q: So why are the insides of my rear tires worn after I got a factory alignment?
    A: Because factory specs call for lots of negative camber and LOTS of toe in. Very safe but bad for tire life. (Another cause for bad rear tire wear is worn out trailing arm bushings (RTABs) giving you dynamic toe changes.)

    Part II

    Q. How does camber affect performance?
    A. To maximize cornering force from your tires, the tire must be square on the road during a corner to achieve max grip. If your car had zero camber (all tires square to the road when driving straight), as soon as you turn, the body will roll to the outside, and the outer tires will roll only on the outsides of the tires. Thats why if you ever drove a car with stock alignment hard in turns, you'll see the outsides of the tires worn.

    Q. Why does the M3 need more camber in the front?
    A. Because of the M3's suspension geometry. Simply put, as the car rolls in a turn, the outside wheels' suspension compresses (makes sense right?). The rear suspension was designed to gain negative camber as it compresses. So as the body rolls, the tire does not roll over as much as the car's body roll, maximizing the tire's contact patch. The front suspension is different, it does not gain significant negative camber as it compresses (during body roll in a corner), and therefore allows the tire to roll over to the outside edge, minimizing traction. This is why you must give the front end more negative camber to begin with. (Another very popular M3 trick is to run a stiff front sway bar, to limit the front body roll and maximize tire contact).

    Q. What is a proper alignment procedure?
    A. Before you get your car aligned, you should know what will happen. The shop will put your car on an alignment rack, and put sensors on the 4 wheels. Some racks have a hard time with very low cars, or cars with spoilers (the Beissbarth rack). BMW suggests weighting the car in several areas. This is fine, but not necessary. At least, it would be good to place weights in the driver's seat equal to your weight. But again, not critical.
    The tech should start at the rear of the car, where he can adjust toe and camber. Rear Toe is adjusted by loosening the 3 bolts that hold the rear trailing arm to the chassis. If you push the arm inward, you get toe in, outward gets toe out. To adjust camber there is an eccentric bolt where the lower control arm bolts to the spindle (or wheel hub, correct term?). Anyway, once this is loose, it can be turned to adjust camber. It has a cam shaped profile, the base circle of the profile gives the most positive setting, the high end of the "cam" gives the most negative setting. Once the settings are reached, the tech will re-tighten the bolts, (if he's good, he'll do it carefully so as not to affect the positions when tightening, which you'll see when the numbers don't just quite match).
    In the front, all that can be "adjusted" is toe. This is just a matter of loosening the tie rod jam nut, and then adjusting the tie rod length, and then tightening down. If the car has camber plates, it can be adjusted at the top of the strut (under the hood) and the tech CAN do this.

    Q. What should I do before I get an alignment?
    A. Know what you want from the car. Know what settings you want, or the shop will give you factory settings. Do you want the best performance with good tire wear? Then you need to address your front camber issue. Either shims, swap some 96+ strut hats, or camber plates. If the shop can install this for you, fine (it'll cost you), but don't assume they will.

    Q. How do I find/install the shims?
    A. First you need to find shims. It is basically a washer, with a hole that fits over the lower strut bolt (at least 10mm IIRC). The washer should be about 0.10" (2.54mm) thick. This should give about -1 deg more camber. Do not go much bigger, as you will lose thread engagement (the bolt will not go in all the way). A 0.10" washer is perfectly safe. All you do is jack the front wheel off the ground, remove the wheel, and remove the 2 lower strut bolts. Then insert the shim between the strut and the spindle, and reinstall. (***Note*** This method will pull the tire closer to the strut and spring perch. If you have coilovers, you may need to run a 5mm spacer (or so) if the tire begins to rub the spring perch. Should not affect non/coilover cars.)

    **EDIT**Updated 24Feb09** Some have asked if it is possible to run a thicker washer [0.20" (or about 5mm)] and purchase longer bolts for the lower strut mount. Theoretically you will gain approximately -2 deg camber (about the same as swapped strut hats), however, this will bring the tire even closer to the strut, and may make it difficult to run wider tires. I have not tried this. See Post 149 for the discussion.

    Q. How do I find/install the 96+ upper strut mounts?
    A. If you have a 95 M3, you can find some used on bf.c. If you have a 96, 97, 98, or 99 M3 you already have these. These upper mounts or "top hats" are a steel plate with 3 studs to bolt to the shock tower, and a ball bearing in the center that holds the top of the strut shaft. You'll have to remove the entire spring/shock assembly on each side, and using a spring compressor to keep tension on the spring. Then you will need an impact tool to remove the top strut nut. Once the nut is off, you simply swap the strut hats from Left to Right, and reinstall. [It is a good idea to clean and repack the bearing before you install/re-install them]. You should have about -2.5 to -3 deg. camber. Don't forget to get an alignment afterwards.

    Q. So why bother with camber plates?
    A. Camber plates give you the most camber, and it is always adjustable. Some people will max out their camber on track/autox, and then adjust it back to a milder setting for the street. (Personally I just leave it ***edit*13Jan10*** - I no longer "just leave it". Now I switch between 2.5deg camber/0.10toe in for the street, and at the track I max out my camber plates giving me about -3.4deg camber/0.20 toe out per side). Also, most camber plates also allow for 2 different caster settings. (I wont go into this discussion, it is generally accepted to get as much caster as possible, but I've heard M3 drivers who prefer less caster, anyway....). Finally, I run Vorshlag camber plates because they have the lowest stack height (and a larger ball bearing center, for more info www.vorshlag.com). This means that if you lower your car, it does not compress the strut as much so you have more travel (no bottoming out), and it lets me run my spring perch higher, more adjustment range for coilovers.

    Q. How does toe affect performance?
    A. Toe behaves similar at either end of the car. Toe in will stabilize the car, making it track straight and not want to change direction. Toe out does the opposite, makes it twitchy, and want to change direction quickly. A car is more responsive with toe out, but less stable.
    FRONT Of CAR - Toe-out in the front lets the car turn in nicely, but may "tramline" down the road (finding grooves and irregularities and following them). Toe-in front makes the car hard to turn and want to "push" or understeer (BTW this is what BMW recommends!).
    REAR OF CAR - Toe-out in the rear is pretty dangerous for RWD cars, makes the car want to spin, especially under hard braking. Toe-in rear will keep the rear stable, and (here is the key) allow for you to put power down as early and as hard as possible without wheel spin. More is not always better, racers will always adjust these settings till they get it just right. For the street, the suggested settings will let you set-it-and-forget-it.

    ***EDIT 6/21/2018***
    Q. What is a good track/race alignment?
    A. This is a good baseline for racing an E36M3 in NASA GTS2, running 245 or wider R-comps.
    This class is dominated by the E36M3 (with one exception of a fast Porsche):

    Front
    Camber: -3.5 to -4.0 deg per side
    Toe: 0

    Rear
    Camber: -1.8 to -2.2 deg per side
    Toe: 0 to 0.10 total toe in
    (IIRC this is 1/8" total toe in)

    Since 2013 I've been running 0 toe all around.
    I use rear toe as a bit of a tuning tool, if the car is loose I'd run as much as 0.20 total toe in. If the car could use more rotation, I'd run 0 rear toe.

    ***END EDIT***

    Q. What is a good track/autox alignment?
    A. Most track guys already know what to do here, but for general FYI, a good baseline is:

    Front
    Camber: -3.5 deg per side
    Toe: 0 (0.10-0.20 total toe out for autox)

    Rear
    Camber: -2.0 to -2.5 deg per side
    Toe: 0.20 total toe in
    (IIRC this is 1/8" total toe in)

    You'll notice it is just slightly more aggressive than a good street alignment. Any more than -3.0 deg camber and 0.10 toe (in or out) per side can lead to inner tire wear with lots of highway driving.
    Some race cars (on race tires) will run even more camber. For race cars, suspension and weight (and usually the track) always plays a role in alignment.

    Here is my car on street tires with -3.3 deg camber front, 0.10 total toe out, and -2.5 deg camber rear, 0.20 total toe in.
    Notice as the car rolls, the tires on the ground are square to the road.


    ***EDIT**Update May 2009***

    Q. I have camber plates on my 95 M3, but I can only get -3.x degrees max. How do I get more neg camber up front?

    A. The 95 M3s (and possibly all pre 96 E36?) have a different front suspension geometry, and can not get as much camber as a 96+. So the solution is to run thin (approx 1mm thick) shims at the lower strut mount to gain an extra -0.5 to -1.0 deg of camber. Couple this with the camber plates, and you now have an adjustable range of up to approx. -4 deg camber. As mentioned above, the shims will bring the top of the tire closer to the strut/spring perch, so you may need to increase size of wheel spacer accordingly (probably no more than 5mm).

    The other option is to buy crash bolts that install in the longitudinally mounted bolt at the middle of the strut. This may offer up to an additional -0.3 degrees.

    Explanation: The 95 M3s have a different front spindle geometry than the 96+. Thats why the 96+ M3s tend to have a higher maximum negative camber when running camber plates. The reason is because the 96+ M3 spindles tilt the strut inboard farther than the 95 M3s, and is presumably why the 96+ strut hats are different than the 95+ hats. In stock position they provide less camber than the 95 mounts, but when swapped, they provide more camber.

    Q. Why believe the author?
    A. You don't have to. I'm not part of a professional race team or anything. But I've done a lot of research, a lot of tuning, and a lot of listening to faster racers. I've had my M3 since 2004. Since then I've learned to develop and setup my M3 competitively for autox and track. In 2005 I was mid pack in my autox class. In 2007 I was beating (and getting beat by) national trophy winners. Also in 2007 I started doing time trials with NASA, and held track records at VIR Full and North Course (which will be improved upon!), and got 3rd place at Redline Time Attack - Summit Point (behind two superb BMW drivers). Also became a certified NASA Instructor Feb 2008.
    I also drive my car on the street, and can't afford uneven tire wear. I DD, autox, and do track events all on the same tires, so they may not last more than a year, but they are usually worn evenly. I have worn tires unevenly, and it was because I was running the wrong alignment settings (usually too much toe!)

    In 2010 I've won all but one NASA MA Time Trial events to claim 2010 NASA MA TTC Championship.
    I competed in the GRM Ultimate Track Car Challenge in 2010 and 2011.
    In 2011, I held the VIR lap record (2:11.1) and the NJMP Thunderbolt lap record (1:32.3), and held the Summit Point lap record for 1 lap (1:22.1) in NASA
    s TTC class.

    UPDATE 6/21/2018
    It's been a few years, so I thought I'd give an update.
    I no longer drive my M3 on the street, not since 2014 because racecar.
    Been racing NASA GTS2 in my E36M3 since 2014.
    In GTS2 trim with 210whp/3100lbs and 285 R comps (25 less hp, and 175lbs lighter setup than in TTC trim), I'm now running 2:06.7 at VIR, 1:20.4 at Summit Point, 1:29 at Dominion, 2:07.0 at Watkins Glen, and 1:28s at Sebring.
    2016, 2017 NASA MA GTS2 Champion
    2017 NASA GTS2 Eastern States Champion


    More to come:

    ??????? What else do you want to know???????
    Last edited by joenationwide; 06-21-2018 at 04:10 PM.

  2. #2
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    Good info... thanks.
    Interested to see more...
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  3. #3
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    interesting to see no toe in on the fronts. good info! keep up the good work.
    Brendan
    "Speed has never killed anyone, suddenly becoming stationary... That's what gets you." -Clarkson
    E36 M3 DIY Page

  4. #4
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    I agree this should be a sticky. Nice writeup Scott!

  5. #5
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    Thank you, that pretty much answered all questions I've seen on this forum about aligning the car. I learned a lot as well.
    Whether you think you can, or whether you think you can't, you're right!

  6. #6
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    Great info and should be a sticky. I understand camber bc i just recently installed the UUC camber arms, but What is toe?

  7. #7
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    wheres the toe adjustment in the rear? i thought rear was only camber adjustable

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zubehor View Post
    wheres the toe adjustment in the rear? i thought rear was only camber adjustable
    On the trailing arm, the 3 bolts.
    Z3 - S50 - OBD2 - Smog Legal - 6 Speed - 3.46 - Anthracite

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BadBoostedBmwM3 View Post
    Great info and should be a sticky. I understand camber bc i just recently installed the UUC camber arms, but What is toe?
    If you are directly above your car (now pretend you have invisible fenders for the next step) and are looking down at the top of your tires, you have "toe in" when your tires look like this / \ and "toe out" when they look like this \ / and "zero toe" if they look like this l l.

  10. #10
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    My Settings and why as wrtten by the prev owner of my car and Nasa Instructor:

    ...I have the Vogtland Cup Kit springs and Koni inserts and I would say it was a significant improvement over my worn stock suspension as I got to track both on back to back days. My only complaint about the Vogtland springs would be the fact that they are a little too soft for my taste. As I started tracking the car more I have come to need something a lot stiffer but have instead tuned the car through other means.

    The first thing I did was install sway bars (TurnerMotorsports). These helped sustantially with turn in and vehicle balance while cornering. They also nearly eliminated body roll, which really helped on quick transisional corners such as chicanes.

    After I had addressed the sway bars it became evident that even with even tire widths all around i couldnt dial out the understeer that was a problem on low speed tight corners. This had to be adjusted with alignment. After searching the web for settings I learned that it was a total feel thing....

    I started with:

    -2.5 camber 0 toe Font
    -1.5 camber 1/8th toe in Rear

    This was by far the most influential change to the vehicles handling. Finally the car wanted to "Bite" on turn in, and was neutral through low speed, corners. When the suspension is "loaded" there is just so much more girp than the stock camber settings.

    I run on Dunlop Super Sport Race tires...and a professional race car driver in a stock E46 M3 (with the same tires) could not catch me on Phoenix International Raceway. I probably actually put distance into him. I think this suspension setup is ENTIRELY the reason why...

    It is a perfect street setup that works REALLY well on the track. Coilovers are totally NOT necessary for a lot of the folks who decide to use them. I have come to wish I had gone with a Ground Control coilover setup (as I track the car two weekends a month) but I cant bring myself to get rid of what may be the best combination of daily driveability/track functionality.
    Cosmo (Brian) was tracking the car 2 weekends per month as an instructor and really learned the car. He put almost 20k with those settings, and I've put another 50K. (I do a 70m per day commute) Those settings were derived with DSII's (7.5" & 8.5") with the Dunlop Super Sport R's 245/40/17 all around. I put another 10k on those tires before switching to the ones in my Sig. In the 40k since the "R's", I've replaced the fronts once about 10k ago, and the rears are due to be replaced soon. Pretty good tire life, and I do abuse them whenever I get a chance......the car turns awesome for sure!

    John
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    ***Got a '95 M3? (actually pretty common on all years! Even happened to Racer Seth Thomas! ) Check Your LSD! http://forums.bimmerforums.com/forum...d.php?t=390209

  11. #11
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    Great post! Def sticky worthy!
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  12. #12
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    Most definitely a sticky material. Thanks Scott.

  13. #13
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    Thanks joenationwide !
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  14. #14
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    Good stuff. A few comments.

    Quote Originally Posted by joenationwide View Post
    (Another very popular M3 trick is to run a stiff front sway bar, to limit the front body roll and maximize tire contact).
    There is no such thing as "front body roll" vs. "rear body roll". The car is one piece - they roll together. Reducing total body roll will reduce understeer due to, as you point out, reduced positive camber in the front in turns (the fronts gain more positive camber in roll and lose more grip than the rears because of the McPherson struts)

    HOWEVER, increasing only the front roll stiffness with just a bar tends to *increase* understeer if not for the reduced roll. The end result of whether you get more or less understeer depends on other factors such as tire characteristics and grip available.

    So it is much better to upsize BOTH front and rear swaybars.

    Quote Originally Posted by joenationwide
    0.20 total toe in (IIRC this is 1/8" total toe in
    FWIW 0.20° (DEGREES!) total toe in = 1/10" or 0.1 inches, and it probably a good number. Note that means:

    0.05" per side,
    1.2 mm per side,
    0.10° per side,
    0°6' per side (that reads 0 degrees, 6 minutes),

    Watch the units on the alignment machine! I've seen techs confuse decimal inches and degrees, resulting in 2x the toe you want, and rapid tire wear!


    The more camber in front you have, the less toe in you want for good tire wear. 0 toe is indeed probably good for -2° to -2.5° camber. For -3.5° you will probably want some toe out. The reason is that when a tire is negative cambered, it wants to steer in, (imagine a coin rolling that's leaning over, it turns), and will scrub if you don't toe it out.

    If you adjust camber at the track and adjust it back for the drive home, take note that the act of changing the camber changes the toe. I don't know how much, but it may be worth getting an alignment, then tell the tech to adjust camber the other way, and note down the toe change. You may need a compromise toe setting, but don't forget you want more toe out with more negative camber.
    Last edited by Jason C SBB; 05-03-2008 at 01:38 PM.
    ///Mello Yello

  15. #15
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    Pretty cool and thanks for the right up, but you forgot to mention the affects of camber when you run 2.5- as you recommend on the street. TRAMLINING!!!

    Where I live the streets are rough, and not smooth. When I ran 2.5- with swapped hats, it would turn in like crazy, but it was a bitch to keep in a straight line. Even while going 80mph i would hit uneven undulations and i'd be fighting the wheel.

  16. #16
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    Helluva write up man! Sticky this asap.

  17. #17
    joenationwide's Avatar
    joenationwide is offline Makes Cars Dance BMW E36 M3 Expert
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    Quote Originally Posted by Modena NYC View Post
    Pretty cool and thanks for the right up, but you forgot to mention the affects of camber when you run 2.5- as you recommend on the street. TRAMLINING!!!

    Where I live the streets are rough, and not smooth. When I ran 2.5- with swapped hats, it would turn in like crazy, but it was a bitch to keep in a straight line. Even while going 80mph i would hit uneven undulations and i'd be fighting the wheel.
    Glad you brought that up. Tramlining is actually more an effect of toe out. When you increase front camber (by swapping hats) you will also increase toe out. Have you checked your toe settings after swapping the hats?

  18. #18
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    Since were talking about alignments one of my m3s needs it bad, my tires are bald on the inside (too much toe and camber). Anyways I bought new tires but are not here yet. Should i get an alignment now with the "bad" tires or wait until i get the new ones installed and get the alignment done right after i have the tires installed? Does it make a difference?

  19. #19
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    Great write up!

  20. #20
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    Excellent! Mods Please Sticky this!!!

  21. #21
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    Good info! Thanks!
    Kind of clean

  22. #22
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    I run 2.5 up front and I don't have Tramlining.....Sure I get more inside tire wear from my mostly freeway daily 70m commute, but I still got almost 30K out of the Fronts.....its a good trade off for the feel I get when I get a Turn. And I maintain a Tire / Christman Credit Union account just for that....

    John
    '95 Hellrot M3 w/Dove
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    ***Got a '95 M3? (actually pretty common on all years! Even happened to Racer Seth Thomas! ) Check Your LSD! http://forums.bimmerforums.com/forum...d.php?t=390209

  23. #23
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    Very good write-up. Thanks for taking the time to put your thoughts down.
    1998 E36 M3/4/5 - 1993 Spec E36 325is
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    MoTeC Man

  24. #24
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    Great writeup. Quick question: is there any resource for determining what camber figures result from particular lowering springs and/or damper combinations without camber plates. In other words, can we compile any anecdotal evidence of the cambers achieved with particular springs?

    I ask because I am planning on installing the TCKline sporting suspension (H&R OE Sport springs and Koni S/A dampers) and want to know what front camber I'm going to end up with. If this post is to be beleived - http://forums.bimmerforums.com/forum...57&postcount=6 - the factory front camber hovers in the -.25 to -1.25 range. Add in the modest OE Sport drop (.75" F, .3" R) and what can I expect?

    Also when going in for an alignment, should we have shims installed or just have them handy if needed?

  25. #25
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    Great Scott! Nice writeup . It's not everyday someone shares such useful information.

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