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Thread: Importing a Car into Canada - A DIY

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    Importing a Car into Canada - A DIY

    I just finished up with an exhaustive step by step write-up on how to import a car into Canada. If you've ever wondered how it works or what it costs, read it here.


    How to Import a Vehicle into Canada



    For all those interested in bringing your dream car into the Great White North, this is for you. It's not as easy as buying a car, paying some duties at the border and getting it insured - it requires a lot of time and dedication. But if you're dead-set on getting a specific (or cheaper) BMW, it's worth it. What follows is a walkthrough on all the steps you need to take to get your baby back home.


    Numbers You'll Need:

    Registrar of Imported Vehicles (RIV)
    Phone: 1-888-848-8240
    Fax: 416-626-0366
    info@riv.ca
    Mon-Fri 7:00am - 12:00am EST
    Sat-Sun 7:00am - 5:00pm EST
    http://www.riv.ca

    Canada Border Service Agency (CBSA)
    Phone: 1-800-461-9999
    Outside Canada: (506) 636-5064
    cbsa-asfc.gc.ca

    Transport Canada
    Phone: 1-800-333-0371
    Outside Canada: (613) 998-2524 or (613) 998-8616
    Fax: (613) 998-4831
    tc.gc.ca
    http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/roadsafety/s...-index-445.htm <-- Basically similar to my walkthrough, but in legalese.

    Lynden Border Crossing (The one I chose to go through, Choose the one closest to you)
    Phone: (360) 354-2183
    Fax: (360) 354-2706

    BMW Canada
    Phone: 1-800-567-2691
    Fax: 905-428-5410
    8:30am - 8:00pm EST

    Useful VMR Value Assessment Link:
    http://www.vmrcanada.com/canada_makes.htm


    Assuming you've found the car you like, have gotten someone in the area to check it out, and, if you're super organized, gotten a local mechanic to inspect it, you're ready to begin the import process. This actually took a lot longer than I expected, and it's full of red-tape and fees.

    What to Do Before You Do Anything:

    Make sure the car is legally allowed into Canada. Several cars, for various reasons, are banned flat out. Don't make the mistake of buying a car not able to cross the border. There's a list of acceptable vehicles here: http://www.tc.gc.ca/media/documents/...fety/vafus.pdf (Check Transport Canada link for non-PDF version).

    The 15 Year Rule:

    If the car is more than 15 years old, determined from the month and year of the build date (found on a sticker on the d. side door paneling), it will not be subject to the same regulations, but you'll still need a "double stamped form 1" at the border, and you'll also need an Out Of Province Inspection. 6 months more on my car and I wouldn't have to deal with any of this, but it's important to note, because it makes importing older cars a lot easier. (See post later in thread for more details).

    For the sake of convenience, let's assume you love the car, everything checks out, and you’re ready to buy it. I took the path of flying down, then driving it back up, so I'll go from there.

    Documents Needed:

    You'll need your seller to provide you with the following documents to keep on hand:

    1. The Vehicle Title (You can do with just a faxed copy before the actual transfer of title takes place).

    2. A Bill of purchase. Just a piece of paper stating “I, Seller, am selling this Vehicle to X for $XXX on the date of X. The VIN # is XXX”. Have both parties sign the bottom with printed names underneath. *In my case, this was fine to go through the border with, but when I went to ICBC recently, they required that I fill out their own Bill of Sale to be signed by myself and the seller. Check with your local insurance agency regarding what they will accept.

    3. A copy of the registration. More on this later.

    Once you have these documents, you'll need to fax them to whatever border crossing you're passing through a full 72 hours in advance. The clock starts the next morning after you fax them, and they don't count Saturdays and Sundays. So assuming you send them in Monday, the clock starts Tuesday and the earliest you can pass through that crossing is Friday. Also note that At some locations, NO IMPORTING IS ALLOWED ON THE WEEKENDS! This almost ruined my trip, so keep that in mind.

    After you fax the documents in, get your plane ticket/transportation/travel papers in order. If you're planning on going on a one way flight, or driving down, make sure you're holding on to that list of documents, as they'll want proof when they question you. If you're shipping it through an auto transporter, now is the time to book it.

    An aside on Auto Transporters:
    Many of the companies I called wouldn't actually cross the border themselves, so you may end up having it shipped to the edge of the country, and having to go down and do the final crossing yourself. Also, you may find it's more cost-efficient if you do the driving. I went from SoCal to Washington, and I received quotes averaging about $1200 USD. My plane ticket was $300 last minute, and gas was only about $100. It was a 3 day trip, so accommodations didn't add up to much either. You also get the thrill of learning about your car over a cross-country trip. If however you find yourself unable to import, this is a good alternative. I believe InterCity Lines Transport is a board sponsor and was previously willing to offer bfc members deals on shipping depending on where you live. Shop around, but know that the cheapest isn't always the best. Get their guarantee on when your car will arrive in writing, and MAKE SURE THEY HAVE FULL INSURANCE! Just type in "Auto Transport Nightmare" into google and see what you get. Don't let this happen to you. Here's a useful page for reviews on auto transporters: http://www.transportreviews.com/

    Insurance:
    If you chose to drive it back up yourself, you're going to need insurance. Go into your local insurance broker and ask for a "Binder of Insurance". This covers you so long as you go from your origin to your destination via the most direct route. There's some wiggle room, but once you get closer to home you can't blast around the canyons the rest of the day. You'll need to provide the VIN and plate # of the car when you're getting insured. This BoI isn't enough on it's own though. It's only valid if it's riding on a registered vehicle with plates. So if the seller has registration on the car, you'll be driving on his or her plates and registration until you reach your destination. When you meet with the seller, you'll need to get him to sign a Notice of Transfer and Release of Liability form at the DMV. This means that if you crash, it's not going on the seller's insurance.

    If the car has no registration or plates, you'll need to go to the nearest DMV and get some. Registration is easy - it comes in the form of a One Trip Permit which lets you leave the country without having to go through emissions testing or any of the other hoops, and it's much cheaper than full registration. You can apply for temporary plates in the same way. Seeing as this is the DMV, be prepared for a long wait. It's best to set half a day to this.

    All the insurance agencies I talked to covered their asses saying I had to call all the DoTs for states I was traveling through to make sure the insurance was valid. After a million infuriating automated messaging systems and left messages, the short answer is yes, it's valid.

    So you've got the car, faxed the border documents, gotten your insurance, and now you're ready to cross the border.

    At the US Border:

    Step into the office and produce the original title, bill of sale, and registration. They'll inspect the car and check the VIN, then stamp your registration, and you're off to home turf.

    At the Canadian Border:

    Produce the same documents again, along with your Driver's license, and they'll hand you a big white/yellow/pink sheet of paper called Form 1. This is really important, so don't lose it. They'll charge you $195 for giving you this form, 7% of the car's value for GST, and 6% for duty. You'll pay provincial sales tax when you get insurance (6% in BC). To give you some perspective, I paid $6600 USD for my car, and at the border, paid $972. All these fees are non-refundable. Once you cross the border, you now have 45 days to get it inspected and registered, otherwise it's sent back to whence it came. And you're out all those border fees. So don't do this. It's unlikely though, because they give you an automatic 10 day extension, and if you call a week or two before deadline, you can get more time. So if you haven't gotten it inspected in 2 months, get off your ass you lazy bastard.

    Once You've Gotten It Back Home:

    You'll need to get a "Recall Clearance Letter" first from BMW Canada. This is letter basically saying the car you have is free from all outstanding recalls in Canada. It MUST have the following: Manufacturer's Logo, official letterhead, the signature of the official with his name and position, and the VIN #. Every other car company does this for free, but, seeing as it's a bimmer, BMW now charges $560 for it. Nothing you can do about it either
    *Edit/NOTE: I have heard from varying sources that this letter may not be required anymore. At this point, without confirmation one way or the other, prepare to pay and be pleasantly surprised if you don't have to. If someone can supply solid facts about this, please post in this thread.
    **Double Edit: See the update at the bottom of this post for more info. The long and short of it seems that you need to get this letter, but there are a few workarounds. Again, don't count on not paying for it, but do your best to get out of it.

    Now you have to bring in into a Canadian Tire to get it officially inspected. There are two inspections you need to go through - An Out of Province inspection (OOP), and a Federal Out-Of-Country Inspection. What you're after is a little stamp on your Form 1. Both deal with the general safety of your car; The OOCI checks to make sure the car is road-legal throughout Canada, and the OOPI checks your vehicle against provincial regulations. You can tow your car to the shop, but you can also get special 1 - 3 day temporary operating permits designed especially for this case. They average around $30 - $80 a day depending on the level of coverage and the value of your car. I wouldn't trust Canadian Tire to empty my ashtray, but unfortunately they've got the government contract. There's also a few local shops that should be licensed to do it, call the RIV to find one in your area. Here's a link to local inspection sites: http://www.riv.ca/RIVInspection.aspx Some, not all, of the thing's they'll look for:

    Metric Speedometer, DOT approved Windshield, Windows, Light bulbs (Take out those Angel Eyes!), child safety restraint harnesses, working seat belts, Catalytic converter present, high mounted stop light, neutral switch, hood struts, acceptable window tint (35% in BC), and daytime running lights. They'll make sure the car is in good working order and nothing could be danger on the road. You'll also need a minimum of 5/32s of tread on all of your tires too. If you have any motor swaps or large conversions like I did, they will need a receipt for the work done. Anything they categorize as a "Major Modification" needs to be accompanied by a receipt showing the shop who did the job and the parts that were installed. So if you're looking at buying an S52 swapped car, make sure you get the paperwork too!

    **As far as the daytime running lights go, you can buy a relay kit at BMW for $307, but Canadian Tire sells one for $27 that does the same thing. In this case the extra money for OEM parts isn't justified. All the DRL do is turn on the headlights when you switch the ignition.**

    If you pass the inspection, they'll stamp your Form 1 and in about a week a new "Canadian Certified" sticker will be mailed to you to stick on your car. If you fail the inspection, you'll have 10 business days (at least at CT you do) to bring your car into line with the standards. Note that if you bought a salvage titled car, you'll need to perform a Structural Integrity Test (about $100 and an hour's work) prior to your OOP.

    The Last Step:

    You've jumped through all the hoops, now comes the final stretch. Bring all your papers to your provincial insurance broker to get your new registration, plates, and insurance. You'll also be paying your provincial sales tax now. Shove the important documents in your sagging glovebox, keep the rest in a file back home, and you're good to go.

    Vroom Vroom:

    Put your key in the ignition, your sunglasses on, and roar away. Congrats!

    Costs:
    As far as cost goes, here's a breakdown:

    Car - $6600 USD, so let's say $7000 CDN
    Plane Ticket - $300
    Binder of Insurance - $60
    Gas for the trip back - $100
    Cheap Hotel - $45
    Border Fee - $195
    Duty and GST - $1000
    PST - $420
    Cdn Tire Inspection - $112
    BMW Recall Letter - $560
    ______________________

    Which brings the total to: $9802. That means that on a car priced similarly to mine, going the same route I did, you're paying around $2700 to bring it across the border. Personally, I'm still pleased with my purchase, but you should go into this aware of the fact that costs quickly add up. I hope people find this DIY helpful!


    ----------------------------------------


    Updates and Useful Info
    :

    ModMike clarifies what constitutes a recall letter:
    Post #335
    Hello all, just a little update taken from the RIV site on what constitutes an acceptable recall letter:

    Acceptable forms of recall clearance documentation

    RIV will accept any of the following recall clearance information:

    1. A letter from the vehicle manufacturer’s U.S. or Canadian head office.The letter must be written on company letterhead clearly stating that there are no outstanding recalls for the vehicle. If the manufacturer's logo does not appear on the letter, it will be rejected. The letter must be dated and signed by an authorized employee of the manufacturer and include their name and title, the vehicle identification number (VIN), year, make and model. RIV routinely forwards a copy of these letters to the manufacturer for authentication.
    2. A printout from an American or Canadian dealership’s vehicle service database.This document must be produced by an authorized dealer and not a reseller. You can confirm whether or not a dealership is authorized by visiting the manufacturer’s web site or by calling their head office and providing them with the dealership’s location. The printout must also contain the 17-digit vehicle identification number (VIN), year, make and model, and indicate that there are no outstanding recalls. RIV routinely forwards a copy of these printouts to the manufacturer for authentication.
    3. Original Equipment Manufacturer’s (OEM) web site.Some manufacturers post their recall information on their public web sites. This recall information will be accepted subject to verification by RIV.

      You need to go to the riv website and create an importer checklist to produce the above text.
    jfboy shares a workaround:
    Post #318
    Post #320
    Go to a US dealer and ask them for a VIN inquiry form. The RIV accepted those as recall letters for both my cars. As soon as you buy the car, you call BMW America and tell them you just bought a BMW and want to notify them of it (don't tell them you're Canadian). They will update the info in the system and that will put the car in your name.

    Then you ask them is there are any open recalls for that car. If they say yes, ask for an appointment to get the recall done (at a US dealer of course). This is a free service.


    If there aren't any open recalls, then just walk into a US BMW dealer and ask them for a VIN Inquiry form on your car.


    This is a 2 page sheet that take like 2 minutes to print. On the first page it has all the maintenance done to the car, on the second page it has a slot where it says "no open recalls" or something similar to that.


    This is the form I handed to the RIV for TWO CARS and they accepted it twice. Yes the car has to be in your name with BMW (title not necessary). The paper has your info on it including an address which obviously has to be a US address (I used my parents address in GA).
    chuck norris delivered a devastating roundhouse kick to BMW with some info on skipping the $500 fee:
    Post #338 *Edited down for readability
    I found a guy who works at a U.S. BMW dealership, on one of the forums I frequent and he was OK to send me a copy of my vehicle service history report.

    Even though the document CLEARLY says "NOT FOR USE FOR IMPORTATION", I tried my luck and, guess what? The RIV didn't even bother asking questions... So, after almost a year of waiting I finally got my FORM 2 "FREE!"
    Quebec Importers: Santiago posts a very detailed write-up about his experiences that may be helpful. Read it at Post #341
    Last edited by hecuter; 11-30-2010 at 03:00 PM. Reason: Updated, fixed links


  2. #2
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    Great thread dude!

    Thanks for the addition.

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    Awesome write up...very informative.

    Now, time to start saving up my money...
    I want the blood.

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    renemesis, you do not have permission to access this page. This could be due to one of several reasons:

    1. Your user account may not have sufficient privileges to access this page. Are you trying to edit someone else's post, access administrative features or some other privileged system?
    2. If you are trying to post, the administrator may have disabled your account, or it may be awaiting activation.


    Is it posted in OT or something?

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    Quote Originally Posted by renemesis View Post


    Is it posted in OT or something?
    Yeah it is. Didn't think about that. I'll repost in my OP here.


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    Very informative, thanks for sharing your hard work.

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    Very good & very informative. I would have a few things to add, importing myself couple of cars already.
    Both times I flew down and drove back home. Both times I received via e-mail or fax the INTENT of the bill of sale with documents that would proof this (from the seller - no biggie). Also detailed description of the car (pictures are best). Received a 30 day temporary insurance, which enabled me to drive around almost to the day the car had all the Canadian paperwork.
    I am not sure when the clock starts (the 72 hr rule is in effect), both times I drove for 2 days, meaning I spent 3 nights there. The 3d day all was clear. Both times I crossed on saturday (first time afternoon, 2nd time sunday night around 1-2 a.m.). The duty is actually 6% (makes a difference if the car is over 20K$) if it's not manufactured in N America. That said if you choose a model that's being built in Carolina, you will still pay the 6% duty, but will be refundaed at a later date.
    Once home:
    Make sure you get back your Inspection form from RIV - without it YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO DO THE OUT OF COUNTRY INSPECTION - which in both instances was FREE (that's why you pay the 195 $ fee). Make sure you phone RIV and ask if they mailed you the form (do that after 8-10 days). Ask me how I know.... If they did not because there was a snag and they did not receive the form in time from the border, all you have to do is fax them your copy. The next day at the latest they will e-mail or fax you (your choice) the needed paper. Canadian Tire will do the Out-of-Country inspection then (you will have to book apointment).
    In the meantime go and do the Out-of-Province inspection, which actually is the nasty one (they don't need the RIV form - they need the Out-of-Prvince inspection form from your local Registry. Go there and pick it up). This one will deal with all the mechanical, electrical and safety stuff, and your car better be OK. The latter I did at the dealer both times. Both times I didn't need to change the speedometer from miles to metric - actually they are still in miles as of today. This was personal choice (more expensive though - but those guys know their cars and I wanted to definitely change anything that wasn't OK. Canadian Tire will this one too for far less money (about 250$ less), but I wouldn't trust my car to them unless it's a 20 year old beater). And I never disposed of my angel eyes and never will.

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    Thanks!
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    A bunch more points:

    1. The 15 year rule. If the car is 15 years old or more (based on production month at the time of import) you don't have to deal with RIV, and don't have to pay the $195 fee. Form 1 costs nothing (except the duty and tax). You also don't have to go through the "out of country" (read: RIV) inspection and modification regime.

    2. Ukranian Tire may not be able to do an OOP inspection, depending on the model and year. When I imported my '03 325i (which was actually CDN spec) they told me only the dealer could do it. They had no problem with my '88 735i though. (This was in Edmonton, at the time).

    3. All of my imports were from overseas, not the US. I strongly recommend using a Customs Broker if you bring a car from overseas. It costs about $250, but the run around it saves, and the mistakes it may avoid make the cost worthwhile. Note the 15 year rule though (I'll explain it below).

    4. Have your ducks in a row, and don't accept the Customs agent's word at face value if you think something is wrong. Again, when I imported my 325i, which was CDN spec from the factory, the Customs agent made me pay RIV and checked the wrong box on the Form 1. As a result, I was looking at 30 days delay before my vehicle could be inspected, during which time the shipping agent was charging me storage fees. I managed to sort it out with a few trips to Edmonton airport (not trivial, as I lived about 30km N of Edmonton). Know what you're doing, and have the documentation on hand, or references ready to present. BTW, my car (325i) was factory ordered while I was living overseas, so I had to import it myself. If you do European Delivery the dealership that handles your order will handle the importation.

    Finally, the 15 year rule:
    Any car that is 15 years old or older may be imported into Canada exempt from RIV/TC regulations as long as it is equipped as originally manufactured (within reason - an after market stereo won't sour the deal. It's mainly engine/drive train mods that can mess it up). European or other spec vehicles cannot be imported into Canada under any circumstances unless they are 15 y.o. For example, a BMW must have left the production line with CDN spec (or US spec if allowed under RIV) in order to be imported, unless it is 15 years old or more. There are no exceptions, and vehicles cannot be modified to comply. This includes US "Grey Market" cars that may have been modified to comply with US DOT/EPA specs - that '95 E34 M5 Touring in California cannot be imported into Canada under current regulation, regardless of what mods were done to make it legal in the US.
    Last edited by JayM; 09-26-2007 at 08:08 PM.
    Jay
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    '86 M5
    '88 325i Cabrio

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    visiting a different country = priceless

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    np everyone. JayM and Doru - do you mind if I quote your posts in the other thread? Also, what do you mean about Cdn Spec vehicles being exempt? Would you mind elaborating on this?
    Last edited by hecuter; 08-22-2007 at 02:16 AM.


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    We are here to help each other out. And I think no opinion and no question is stupid (because nobody is born a genius).
    Go ahead and do your deed - Hecuter.

    Also, if somebody has the means, you are better off to buy a newer model (like 3-4 years old) and you are still ahead of the game as of today where the loonie is almost at par with our green counterpart. There are wicked prices for Volvo S60, Saab 9-3 and 9-5, some Porsche (although expensive - but still close to 1/2 price), for Mercedes you will have to contact the seller to provide the VIN and send it Ottawa for approval, and our pride and joy the BMW. All at unbeatable prices.
    And to make life easier for those who don't know, here's a link to check the used price value for Canadian vehicles. (Some dealers will curse me now).

    http://www.vmrcanada.com/canada_makes.htm

    So do your homework and get that nice AFFORDABLE baby now.

    Addendum: US border (Sweetgrass - this S Alberta) have a "new" formality of exporting from the US to Canada. Here it is in detail:
    http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/export/ex...e_personal.xml
    You'll notice there is a worksheet to be filled. It is downloadable through the same link. Not sure for the rest of Canada, but there might be some changes too due to the massive importing of cars that's going on lately.
    Last edited by Doru; 10-04-2007 at 04:35 PM.

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    ^^^ cool link.
    2008 E92 M3
    2011 E90 335xi
    2007 E70 X5 4.8i
    1994 E36 M3 Euro Spec



    Gone:
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    1992 E36 325i/4

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    Quote Originally Posted by hecuter View Post
    np everyone. JayM and Doru - do you mind if I quote your posts in the other thread? Also, what do you mean about Cdn Spec vehicles being exempt? Would you mind elaborating on this?
    Go ahead.

    If the car was originally CDN spec, and has the sticker on the B pillar (driver's side) it doesn't require RIV registration. You could also argue that you shouldn't have to pay duty if it has already been in Canada (in my case I was the first to bring it in, so I had to pay) and even GST if it's a used car from a private sale. I don't guarantee that it'll work though.

    Doru,

    Good link. People need to remember that it's a guideline though, like Kelley Blue Book for the states. Prices can vary greatly even from city to city.
    Jay
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    '86 M5
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    One more thing to add. There was a stink in the Canadian media in february, if you remember about imported cars from the US and not to buy them, because people who import them are crooks and pick vehicles that were written off and build out of 2 or 3 cars etc. (I think dealers panicked - lots of expensive cars were imported since the loonie caught up with the green buck - and personally I think they got involved in that media stampede)
    The thing is that with 7 or 8 $ you can do your Carfax research on the net and you'll know everything about the vehicle you want to buy (money well spent). Also you get to keep that copy (downloadable format) so you have it at all times. And also, as far as I know ther is some kind of agreement between our country and the US to swap car info - just for this reason (So when you will eventually sell it, the record of the car is there)

    Hope this helps a little
    Last edited by Doru; 10-04-2007 at 04:36 PM.

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    Very informative thread, thank you

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    cool info
    this should be 'parked'

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    I agree, we should get hugo to park this one!

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    1996 328i
    Costs:
    As far as cost goes, here's a breakdown:

    Car - $6600 USD, so let's say $7000 CDN
    Where have you been man? Canadian dollar is par with American dollar....

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Vancouver (NorfVan)
    Posts
    512
    My Cars
    332is
    Quote Originally Posted by 91mat325 View Post
    Where have you been man? Canadian dollar is par with American dollar....
    At the time it wasn't.


  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    596
    My Cars
    1996 328i
    What do you do for insurance and registration before the car passes inspections and such. Im probably not going to mess around with registration, but i'll obviously insure it, will the insurance company let you insure it before you pass those federal and provincial inspections, or is that all registry related?

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Vancouver (NorfVan)
    Posts
    512
    My Cars
    332is
    Quote Originally Posted by 91mat325 View Post
    What do you do for insurance and registration before the car passes inspections and such. Im probably not going to mess around with registration, but i'll obviously insure it, will the insurance company let you insure it before you pass those federal and provincial inspections, or is that all registry related?
    You can drive it on temporary insurance/plates - typically 1 day A -> B insurance. A couple caveats - you can only buy it for the purpose of preparing your car for inspections, and you can only drive the most direct route from the shop to your house. If you're caught nowhere near where a shop would be, or aren't taking an A-B route, your insurance is invalid. However, I was talking with a guy from the BMW dealer today and he said it doesn't really matter, you can always say you have a special shop you go to, even if it's 3 hours away by mountain pass. Just make sure you call 'the shop' ahead of time so they can corroborate, even if it takes a case of beer.

    So basically, if you're wanting it to be a DD before the inspections, you're going to be S.O.L. But if you want to go for a little blast, you're fine so long as you make arrangements before hand.


  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    596
    My Cars
    1996 328i
    Quote Originally Posted by hecuter View Post
    You can drive it on temporary insurance/plates - typically 1 day A -> B insurance. A couple caveats - you can only buy it for the purpose of preparing your car for inspections, and you can only drive the most direct route from the shop to your house. If you're caught nowhere near where a shop would be, or aren't taking an A-B route, your insurance is invalid. However, I was talking with a guy from the BMW dealer today and he said it doesn't really matter, you can always say you have a special shop you go to, even if it's 3 hours away by mountain pass. Just make sure you call 'the shop' ahead of time so they can corroborate, even if it takes a case of beer.

    So basically, if you're wanting it to be a DD before the inspections, you're going to be S.O.L. But if you want to go for a little blast, you're fine so long as you make arrangements before hand.
    How about getting my car from the shipping port to my house? The shipping company I am going through takes care of everything for me at the border, and then drops it off at a place in Calgary where I have to pick it up.

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