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Thread: 1982 628CSi rebuild

  1. #51
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    Undergoing restauration; my 1982 628CSi: https://www.bimmerforums.com/forum/s...628CSi-rebuild

  2. #52
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    I'm adding four photo's per message and then I wait half a day, otherwise the forumsoftware makes an update to the previous post which makes for really long pages that take forever to load.







    The sills have been opened for inspection, my reasoning isthat it is cheaper to inspect and prepare then to repair after the car has been repainted and refinished.
    Undergoing restauration; my 1982 628CSi: https://www.bimmerforums.com/forum/s...628CSi-rebuild

  3. #53
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    Thats it for now with pictures of rust, from this point we will focus on repairing the body and reinforcing it where needed. Please let me know which spots are important to take reinforce, I'm thinking of:
    * front: weld material from shock towers to rest of body and weld mounts on the towers for a removable bar between the towers
    * front: shock towers to bulk head or further into the car
    * rear: strut or 'X' brace between the rear shock towers and decide whether to put the battery between the towers or akin the M6 on the fuel door side.
    * inside: a lower cage next to the seats only?
    * stitch weld all parts
    * butch the rear end up to keep the diff as-is without ripping the body. I know there is a strengthened diff mount group buy currently that I initially subscribed to, but I think we will build something ourselves. I might be tempted to use the diff from the donor vehicle if it will fit.

    I found an E39 donor car that we will use to take the engine and wiring loom from, pics will follow later. First I have to save up to get the car chemically dipped to remove all paint, seam sealant, under body protection and rust. Then we can truly see where the real problems are and start to fix them. The good side is that it gives time to ask suggestions and think where I want this car to be heading, construction wise.





    There is one thing I'd like to say and that is that I frequently ask myself whether I'm doing the right thing, how would you guys do this? When I see all this rust it depresses me a bit... The car is from 1982 and has lived its life in The Netherlands. 37 years in a rainy climate is not like buying a Californian, Arizonan or Texan car where - at least I think - cars are preserved a lot better due to drier climates.

    One thing that I do know, when this car is finished it'llnever sleep outside again!
    Last edited by Nullified; 06-04-2019 at 05:01 PM.
    Undergoing restauration; my 1982 628CSi: https://www.bimmerforums.com/forum/s...628CSi-rebuild

  4. #54
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    Hi
    The rust on your car is not that bad. Rust issues are the biggest problem for anyone. The amount of time that goes into repairing it is huge. Mechanical work is simple and fast by comparison. Most bodyshops in my experience do repairs that are quick and easy as most people do not want to pay for the extensive work involved.

    The saying goes "The Italian's invented rust and BMW perfected it in the (e9, 635csi etc)"

    The 635 has a lot of rust traps built in. The area under the B post has four layers of metal and a joint in the sill. On my car I had to cut away all four layers and make repair sections. The whole car has rusty sections where panels join and some of the rust is invisible as it starts inside and works it way out. When I was repairing the rear lower sill I saw rust behind the B post that was only visible looking in from the cut away section.

    With regard to dipping, what can happen is that the acid leaks into the seams of the panels and can remain to cause corrosion. The attention to detail is important. How well is the work carried out. Often you see people saying "better than new" with regard to repairs.
    When the cars were built they spot welded coated steel and added seam sealer and even UK cars had rust proofing yet they still rusted. Welding causes corrosion unless the weld is immediately covered by a surface coating of paint. I have seen on the cars where the welding has been done on the chassis legs for brackets and you can see the rust from where the coating burnt off.
    Money no object, dip the shell repair all rust, check with an endoscope. Add drain holes at the bottom of the sills front and back. Then re-dip and get e-coated. Check with endoscope to make sure all areas are covered then anti rust protection. Then check with endoscope to make sure all areas are covered.
    "Better than new"
    If you live in a damp climate you have to keep the car in a dehumidified garage and not drive it in the rain.
    It might be cheaper to move to a dry climate!
    Keep at it. The best bit is when you first drive it. Then you forget the pain and start on another one.

  5. #55
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    Wow, how did I miss this thread ? Do not keep up with the hours of $$ invested. Great story and project. The e34 is not a simple swap either if you go with the e34 motronics

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmpower View Post
    Hi
    The rust on your car is not that bad. Rust issues are the biggest problem for anyone. The amount of time that goes into repairing it is huge. Mechanical work is simple and fast by comparison. Most bodyshops in my experience do repairs that are quick and easy as most people do not want to pay for the extensive work involved.
    I had a look at a lot of Youtube videos that had cars that were more rusted out than mine to motivate me to go on with this project, as in, 'If those cars can be restored then mine can be done too!'. Besides repairing bodywork there will be adaptations due to the new engine that will be used from the donor car, however I think that creating a couple of new engine mounts is not that much work compared to restoring the body of the car.

    Quote Originally Posted by jmpower View Post
    The saying goes "The Italian's invented rust and BMW perfected it in the (e9, 635csi etc)"
    I haven't heard that one before but I sure do believe it! I just hope Alfa Romeo's rust more than my car. Have you ever seen an Alfasud in real life? They were jokingly said to rust in the brochures... I do love Italian cars though, but only up to the eighties when all producers were independant of each other and not sharing platforms. The last Alfa I like is the 164 which did have shared platform (with Saab/Fiat/Lancia) but it was just a sleek car with a powerful 3-litre V6.

    Knipsel.jpg

    Quote Originally Posted by jmpower View Post
    The 635 has a lot of rust traps built in. The area under the B post has four layers of metal and a joint in the sill. On my car I had to cut away all four layers and make repair sections. The whole car has rusty sections where panels join and some of the rust is invisible as it starts inside and works it way out. When I was repairing the rear lower sill I saw rust behind the B post that was only visible looking in from the cut away section.
    Is that the only part in the lower area with multiple layers of steel? I know all the window pillars are reinforced for strength but to my knowledge they won't rust much due to being on the top half of the car where no water is trapped. When you look at the front and rear window surrounds, the parts under where the rubber were when the windows were still in the car you not see any rust. That gives me hope that the insides of the pillars are still okay.

    Quote Originally Posted by jmpower View Post
    With regard to dipping, what can happen is that the acid leaks into the seams of the panels and can remain to cause corrosion. The attention to detail is important. How well is the work carried out. Often you see people saying "better than new" with regard to repairs.
    When the cars were built they spot welded coated steel and added seam sealer and even UK cars had rust proofing yet they still rusted. Welding causes corrosion unless the weld is immediately covered by a surface coating of paint. I have seen on the cars where the welding has been done on the chassis legs for brackets and you can see the rust from where the coating burnt off.
    Money no object, dip the shell repair all rust, check with an endoscope. Add drain holes at the bottom of the sills front and back. Then re-dip and get e-coated. Check with endoscope to make sure all areas are covered then anti rust protection. Then check with endoscope to make sure all areas are covered.
    "Better than new"
    This is a fair point that you mention, it will cost a lot of money but it will also prevent future corrosion. I'm intermittantly looking for a dependable supplier in the area but there is a lot of foggy information on classic car forums in my eyes. Basically there are three methods to get the shell bare:
    1: media blasting
    2: pyrolysis
    3: chemically dipping

    Media Blasting cannot get into the area's where it's really difficult to reach and can damage the larger panels as blasting makes the metal locally hot and will stretch metal, ultimately creating a lumpy shell. Not my first choice.

    Pyrolysis will heat the shell evenly and completely to a couple of hundred degrees to burn the paint and underside body protection off, but does not remove rust. The heat will be 100% throughout the shell. Not my first choice.

    Chemically dipping will get all nasty area's covered as long as - you correctly mention - to open up the places that are hollow to let the chemicals in and the air out. It will also remove rust and leaves me with a bare and rust free shell. Seems like the best method to get a durable result.

    Quote Originally Posted by jmpower View Post
    If you live in a damp climate you have to keep the car in a dehumidified garage and not drive it in the rain.
    It might be cheaper to move to a dry climate!
    Keep at it. The best bit is when you first drive it. Then you forget the pain and start on another one.
    That'll be a problem, I may need to get a plastic cocoon to park the car in when not in use in the winter as our heat pump dryer is also located in the garage and it emits damp air. Moving to a dry climate sounds like a good idea but that may mean moving to Portugal or Spain and I don't speak those languages (yet). Also, the wages are really low in that part of Europe.
    I am looking forward to the day we fire up the engine even if that takes a while!
    Last edited by Nullified; 06-14-2019 at 01:22 PM. Reason: added peekture
    Undergoing restauration; my 1982 628CSi: https://www.bimmerforums.com/forum/s...628CSi-rebuild

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by 88m53453 View Post
    Wow, how did I miss this thread ? Do not keep up with the hours of $$ invested. Great story and project. The e34 is not a simple swap either if you go with the e34 motronics
    I am keeping an Excel to keep up with costs as I like to know...
    And I did not buy an E34 donor but an E39, I have some plans to not use the OEM ECU but an aftermarket one which makes me think wiring should not be that much of a problem as we will use the wiring loom of the E39. I will also use the gearbox out of the E39. It means the car will be mechically upgraded to an E39.
    Undergoing restauration; my 1982 628CSi: https://www.bimmerforums.com/forum/s...628CSi-rebuild

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nullified View Post
    Have you ever seen an Alfasud in real life? They were jokingly said to rust in the brochures
    My first cars were Alfasuds and then the coupe version and then a couple of Alfetta's. They were great cars to drive and the sound of those flat four engines when you backed of the accelerator was unlike any other car. The Alfetta had the gearbox at the rear for weight balance. They would make your hair rise on the back of your neck with the sounds. They were like racing cars at that time. The cars I had were also reliable and did not give problems. The road holding was excellent and I can still remember some great drives.

    The problem was when you closed the door, you could hear the rust flakes falling down inside



    With regard to your car I would suggest you repair what you see first and then see what you want to do from there. Remove the paint and cut away the rusted metal and repair. Get a cheap inspection camera and check all the box sections for rust. The inner part of your sills look very clean. Most of the cars I have seen have a "tide mark" of rust about 30-40mm high from water lodged in there as it cannot escape.
    The bottom of the cars seem to see the most rust, on mine the bottom of the front wings where they mount to the sills and the front bumper were rotted also both rear wheel arches and the rear panel, front panel is also rusty and is a complex panel with lots of rust traps. Under the front windscreen has rust.

    The body panels are very expensive compared to the 5 series cars they are based on.

  9. #59
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    Here's a few pictures of the roadtrip of us getting the donor vehicle in Germany.

    On route, driving in Germany. Legally you can drive as fast as you dare on this stretch of A3, also known as the "Oberhausen Straight".



    With a trailer you are allowed 80 km/h and if it is TUV-approved (a certain technical condition), 100 km/h. We drove a bit faster with the empty trailer though.


    Looking back:


    Music by Kraftwerk; seemed like a nice hommage.


    And the donor vehicle:



    On the way back it rained like crazy and because of this we slowed down to 70km/h on the Autobahn. There was an incredible huge amount of water pooring down and I did not want to expierence aquaplaining today. The tyres on my Passat are pretty new, and the trailer won't go anywhere with that weight on its back. It also had 4 new tyres, and 4 used ones. I was positively surprised by the fuel consumption of the Passat averaging 6.7L per 100km for the whole day, there and back.


    Last edited by Nullified; 06-16-2019 at 12:07 PM. Reason: typo
    Undergoing restauration; my 1982 628CSi: https://www.bimmerforums.com/forum/s...628CSi-rebuild

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmpower View Post
    My first cars were Alfasuds and then the coupe version and then a couple of Alfetta's. They were great cars to drive and the sound of those flat four engines when you backed of the accelerator was unlike any other car. The Alfetta had the gearbox at the rear for weight balance. They would make your hair rise on the back of your neck with the sounds. They were like racing cars at that time. The cars I had were also reliable and did not give problems. The road holding was excellent and I can still remember some great drives.

    The problem was when you closed the door, you could hear the rust flakes falling down inside

    With regard to your car I would suggest you repair what you see first and then see what you want to do from there. Remove the paint and cut away the rusted metal and repair. Get a cheap inspection camera and check all the box sections for rust. The inner part of your sills look very clean. Most of the cars I have seen have a "tide mark" of rust about 30-40mm high from water lodged in there as it cannot escape.
    The bottom of the cars seem to see the most rust, on mine the bottom of the front wings where they mount to the sills and the front bumper were rotted also both rear wheel arches and the rear panel, front panel is also rusty and is a complex panel with lots of rust traps. Under the front windscreen has rust.

    The body panels are very expensive compared to the 5 series cars they are based on.
    Alright, I see now you're from Ireland, coupled that to the build quality of an Alfasud mixed with the famous Irish weather - lots of RAIN!!!! - and this makes for very flaky Alfa's indeed!

    I was in Dublin last Octobre and by chance it was dry and not too cold. See attached image below.

    IMG_20181026_134826.jpg

    Those places have rust on my car too - front fender mounts, wheel arches and some more places - so these are the 'known' spots, I'm not too worried about them actually but more afraid of the layered rust traps.

    For the wellbeing of the sills I might put two large holes in the bottom and put a rubber bung (whats the correct name for this?) in, just like in modern cars. If any moisture gets in, just pull the rubber bungs out and it'll drain and dry up.

    Your idea about the inspection camera is clever, thanks for the tip! I'll find one, see if I can get a used one.
    Undergoing restauration; my 1982 628CSi: https://www.bimmerforums.com/forum/s...628CSi-rebuild

  11. #61
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    Lidl or Aldi do a cheap inspection camera. I bought one and it works fine(€65-70) Another option is a cheap ebay item that uses your phone as the screen.
    With regard to the sills I pressed a recess into the inner sill at the bottom. When the outer sill is attached any water can drain out of the sill as it is the lowest point. If you drill a hole in the outer sill it would not be the lowest point.
    The holes in the sills are sometimes called drain holes but they are so high up they are vent holes as they are useless for draining water in the sill. Any water that passes the outside rear window rubbers will end up in the sills.

  12. #62
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    I don't have much news as we're moving the car to a new location, I did buy a set of newer seats for the car. The original Recaro seats are old and relatively 'loose' in the hinges. For this reason I'll sell the beige leather Recaro set and these will be fitted. They are from a UK-spec E63 (hence the memory buttons on the right sided seat), does anyone know if the memory function is in the button housing? Otherwise I'll pick up a LHD-spec button housing and swap it into the left seat to get two seats with memory.

    To make the rear seat look identical to the front I'll have them reupholstered with the same material as the fronts, I figured it's cheaper to reupholster rear seats than front seats and we'll have to weld the car in many places so might aswel create a good base for the E63 seats.











    - - - Updated - - -

    I have the front and rear seatbelts in beige too by the way, and both seatbelt restainers. One is just not mounted on the seat.
    Undergoing restauration; my 1982 628CSi: https://www.bimmerforums.com/forum/s...628CSi-rebuild

  13. #63
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    I'm not familiar with the E63 seats, however, normally seats with memory have a separate memory module mounted under the seat along with the seat motors.

    Roger

  14. #64
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    There haven't been many updates lately as we're moving shop, my car was in a relatively small workshop (+- 40m2) without vehicle lift and this will change as I've purchased a two columns lift and the whole workshop is larger now. This means my workshop and the workshop of Mr. Restorer are now merged into one (+- 120m2) including an office and two lifts.

    The workshop is not finished yet but here are some pics of the progress.

    Four heavy concrete ballast blocks to support the column lifts have been placed into the ground to ensure a safe working area. To close the floor off a poured floor will be added in summer, the drying time is just too long now due to the dampness and cold. After the floor's been poored the concrete blocks will be hidden from sight.
    An office has been built up to do all office tasks like researching, discussing and eating. And sending invoices offcourse.
    More pics to follow when it's finished and the car is in.
    signal-2019-09-28-104759-31.jpgsignal-2019-09-28-104759-5.jpgsignal-2019-09-28-104759-2.jpgsignal-2019-09-28-104759-1.jpgsignal-2019-09-28-104759.jpg
    Last edited by Nullified; 11-29-2019 at 03:45 AM.
    Undergoing restauration; my 1982 628CSi: https://www.bimmerforums.com/forum/s...628CSi-rebuild

  15. #65
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    Do the seats need an adapter plate or any major rework to be swapped out?

  16. #66
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    Don't know yet...
    Undergoing restauration; my 1982 628CSi: https://www.bimmerforums.com/forum/s...628CSi-rebuild

  17. #67
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    I have a question concerning the rear wheel wells: Walloth & Nesh only have the wheel well repair parts for the pre 05 '82 cars and mine is an E28 based model, so basically W&N indicates these parts are not for my car. However, I need only a few parts of the wheel well and not the complete part. What is the precise difference between the rear wheel wells of the prefacelift and facelift models?

    https://www.wallothnesch.com/radlaufblech-hinten-links-fuer-alle-modelle-bis-05-1982-wird-1x-pro-auto-benoetigt-41-14-00.html

    wheelwell.PNG

    signal-2019-12-06-132910.jpgsignal-2019-12-06-132910-1.jpgsignal-2019-12-06-132910-2.jpg

    Any help will be greatly appriciated.
    Undergoing restauration; my 1982 628CSi: https://www.bimmerforums.com/forum/s...628CSi-rebuild

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nullified View Post
    There is one thing I'd like to say and that is that I frequently ask myself whether I'm doing the right thing, how would you guys do this? When I see all this rust it depresses me a bit... The car is from 1982 and has lived its life in The Netherlands. 37 years in a rainy climate is not like buying a Californian, Arizonan or Texan car where - at least I think - cars are preserved a lot better due to drier climates.

    One thing that I do know, when this car is finished it'llnever sleep outside again!


    Hi Nullified,

    You have a very good feeling. I do have
    large experience with Rust and the amount
    of labor is needed is bloody expensive and
    time consuming. To fix rust the proper way
    will require acid dip as you I assume doing ?
    Ones it's all fixed then you need to plate the
    entire chassis to really block the metal from
    moist..that alone is another dosh of money..

    Personally I will never be able to sleep knowing
    that I have butchered, cut, welded metal pieces
    on the car...knowing that a non rusted California
    shells can get for very little coin...A San Diego friend
    part out E24s and he is throwing the shells away..
    he had a black 87' all original paint which I
    purchased the front fenders.

    Years ago one of my E24M6 went to The Netherlands
    and far as I remember the importation taxes were not
    that much..and that was 6-7 years ago. Now that you
    can get E24 with 30years+ old then should be easier
    no ?

    We are not dealing here with W198 were its
    Gold and the condition absolute does not matter.

    I am not trying to rain on your project. Been
    there with rust issues and the results were always
    rust comes back under !!!!

    Think the pros and cons of what you need to go
    thru.

    Regards,
    Anri
    Last edited by sofiabghome; 12-09-2019 at 12:28 PM.
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  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by sofiabghome
    Hi Nullified,

    You have a very good feeling. I do have large experience with Rust and the amount of labor is needed is bloody expensive and time consuming. To fix rust the proper way will require acid dip as you I assume doing ? Ones it's all fixed then you need to plate the entire chassis to really block the metal from moist..that alone is another dosh of money..

    Personally I will never be able to sleep knowing that I have butchered, cut, welded metal pieces on the car...knowing that a non rusted California shells can get for very little coin...A San Diego friend part out E24s and he is throwing the shells away.. He had a black 87' all original paint which I purchased the front fenders.
    Hi Anri,

    thanks for your wise words, I could import a shell from a dry climate and use this but this will also require cutting here and there as I want the whole chassis to be reinforced and maybe I want to use a small rollcage. This will require welding too. If he has dry shells going to the schredder would he be willing to cut some parts out for me to use and ship them to The Netherlands?

    Quote Originally Posted by sofiabghome
    Years ago one of my E24M6 went to The Netherlands and far as I remember the importation taxes were not that much..and that was 6-7 years ago. Now that you can get E24 with 30years+ old then should be easier no ?
    The main part in importing a car is the extra taxes you pay up to when it becomes aproximately 20 years old, where you pay some 10% in tax and from age 25 it is reduced to 0%. So you are right, importing an old car is inexpensive when not taking international sea travel into account.

    Quote Originally Posted by sofiabghome
    We are not dealing here with W198 were its Gold and the condition absolute does not matter.
    No Mercedes for me, sorry. I lack about 300.000 for this car, I'd love to have one but the cost is too much.

    Quote Originally Posted by sofiabghome
    I am not trying to rain on your project. Been there with rust issues and the results were alwaysrust comes back under !!!!
    I don't see it as rain, just constructive comments. I will do the acid dipping and then the anti-rust treatment to my car, it will make it more expensive to build but less expensive to keep on the road in 10 years from now as there will be no more rust, apart from incidental damages that may occur.

    Quote Originally Posted by sofiabghome
    Think the pros and cons of what you need to go thru.

    Regards,
    Anri
    I have and as I have many plans that require a lot of welding and rebuilding I don't know if the added cost of a new shell and the transport will be less as there are parts rusted out that need replacement AND parts that need changing due to my personal wishes.
    Any idea on the difference between rear wheel wells from pre '82 and newer vehicles?

    cheers! Melvin
    Undergoing restauration; my 1982 628CSi: https://www.bimmerforums.com/forum/s...628CSi-rebuild

  20. #70
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    https://www.onlinecarparts.co.uk/van-wezel-1277815.html

    When I saw the picture you posted of the wheel arch repair panel I thought it looked like the one I bought from a seller on German ebay. The link is to the Van Wezel part that I wanted to buy as it was cheaper than Walloth & Nesch and the ebay seller.
    When I received the panels I believe that they were Van Wezel panels with the name partially removed to obscure their origin as the seller was making a large mark up. I could not get the panels delivered from Germany. I believe the panels that W&N sell are possibly the Van Wezel panels as no one else seems to make them.
    If you have a look on that link you will see that the part is listed for e24 1975- 1987.
    I fitted one rear arch panel and the fit was not good. I had to section the panel into three parts. The main mismatch was at the rear.
    I had not heard of a difference but it is possible W&N had a repair panel made for the later cars. I believe that they had problems with the pressing as the quality of the pressing got worse.

    This is a e24 highline model (US or World style bumpers)
    PICT0005.jpg

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nullified View Post
    thanks for your wise words, I could import a shell from a dry climate and use this but this will also require cutting here and there as I want the whole chassis to be reinforced and maybe I want to use a small rollcage. This will require welding too. If he has dry shells going to the schredder would he be willing to cut some parts out for me to use and ship them to The Netherlands?

    The main part in importing a car is the extra taxes you pay up to when it becomes aproximately 20 years old, where you pay some 10% in tax and from age 25 it is reduced to 0%. So you are right, importing an old car is inexpensive when not taking international sea travel into account.
    Melvin,

    Thanks for your reply.
    Yes he has so many body parts and most
    of his parts are from early cars and late cars.

    Last month he had absolute perfect shell and he cut
    half the car and shipped to Canada...I really never
    understood who is going to spent all the bloody work
    to fix a car in such a major damage..? weird. I
    only will understand this from sentimental point of
    view ?

    Shipping to The Netherlands is about $1200-1500
    for a shell.

    Still not too late... You don't have to go thru the
    procedures bellow. I am not sure how much is to sand
    blast a shell in NL also to plate the shell ?

    In CA to sand blast a shell is about 1000 give or take
    then plating is at least 1000

    But if you are firm on to fixing and staying with this
    then that's fine.

    The most important thing is to finish all the weldings
    around the shell and then ones you lift off your welding
    mask that's it. Sent the shell to sand blast. Ones all is
    done then sent the shell to Plating. This is the most
    important procedure as what the factory did to prevent
    rust for at least 5 years driven in winter climate.

    If you don't Plate the shell then rust will always come
    back...

    Ones, all of that is done, the other important factor is
    Epoxy primer to seal the shell. Then paint it.

    This is the Factory procedure to seal the shell.

    I will e-mail you my friend's numbers and get in touch
    with him.

    Regards,
    Anri
    Last edited by sofiabghome; 12-10-2019 at 09:56 AM.
    - E24 M6 88' Shwartz/Sparco Race Track Toy S38-B36
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  22. #72
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    184
    My Cars
    1982 628CSi
    Anri,

    My car will receive significant fortifications which basically means welding a shit tonne of material into the shell and even with a perfect rust free shell it'll need to be galvanized. I'm gonna save myself the trouble of getting a rust free shell as I estimate the cost of procuring and shipping will even out with the rust-removal from my chassis, and then I still have the extra's to undertake.

    Chemically de-painting and de-rusting/galvanizing will set me back some € 5.000 if I'm correct, call me crazy, but I think this car will become a unique one of a kind vehicle when done.

    I am however, interested in buying some parts that are in good shape.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by jmpower View Post
    https://www.onlinecarparts.co.uk/van-wezel-1277815.html

    When I saw the picture you posted of the wheel arch repair panel I thought it looked like the one I bought from a seller on German ebay. The link is to the Van Wezel part that I wanted to buy as it was cheaper than Walloth & Nesch and the ebay seller.
    When I received the panels I believe that they were Van Wezel panels with the name partially removed to obscure their origin as the seller was making a large mark up. I could not get the panels delivered from Germany. I believe the panels that W&N sell are possibly the Van Wezel panels as no one else seems to make them.
    If you have a look on that link you will see that the part is listed for e24 1975- 1987.
    I fitted one rear arch panel and the fit was not good. I had to section the panel into three parts. The main mismatch was at the rear.
    I had not heard of a difference but it is possible W&N had a repair panel made for the later cars. I believe that they had problems with the pressing as the quality of the pressing got worse.

    This is a e24 highline model (US or World style bumpers)
    PICT0005.jpg
    Thanks, I called Van Wezel in Belgium and they have these parts available but I have to order through a wholesaler, which I did. These are the only sheetmetal parts available unfortunately.

    The same parts cost € 139,90 at W&N and I was quoted € 64.13 for L+R at Brezan
    image.png
    Last edited by Nullified; 12-11-2019 at 08:42 AM.
    Undergoing restauration; my 1982 628CSi: https://www.bimmerforums.com/forum/s...628CSi-rebuild

  23. #73
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Posts
    4,577
    My Cars
    81 euro 635, 4.4 X5
    There is a difference in the fit of the wheel arches between the E12 and E28 based cars. Where the difference lies is between the front of the arch and the back of the bulkhead in the front of the wheel well. It's been a long time since I have done mine but one fits very close and the other at least an inch away. I found this out when I went to let in the panels I cut from a later scrap yard car into my 81. So do pay attention to this detail. Other than that, it wasn't a major amount of work to get it right, and everything lined up well.
    81 Euro undergoing total nut and bolt restoration
    pictures at: flickr.com/photos/bertsphotos

  24. #74
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    184
    My Cars
    1982 628CSi
    Quote Originally Posted by Bert Poliakoff View Post
    There is a difference in the fit of the wheel arches between the E12 and E28 based cars. Where the difference lies is between the front of the arch and the back of the bulkhead in the front of the wheel well. It's been a long time since I have done mine but one fits very close and the other at least an inch away. I found this out when I went to let in the panels I cut from a later scrap yard car into my 81. So do pay attention to this detail. Other than that, it wasn't a major amount of work to get it right, and everything lined up well.
    Thanks for the information Bert, when more progress has been made I'll post pics.

    The parts are in my posession and cost € 64.61 for both. I was just wondering if 'oversize' means that these were purposed for cheap and shoddy repair, where a new panel is placed over the old and welded up and that all is a little bit differently sized than the original.
    IMG_20191214_112541_Bokeh.jpgIMG_20191214_112458.jpgIMG_20191214_113020v1.jpgIMG_20191214_112327.jpg
    Last edited by Nullified; 12-14-2019 at 10:06 AM.
    Undergoing restauration; my 1982 628CSi: https://www.bimmerforums.com/forum/s...628CSi-rebuild

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