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Thread: Replacement of the CCV on M54

  1. #1
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    Replacement of the CCV on M54

    Edit: Here's an M54 CCV replacement DIY vid:
    BavAuto M54 CCV replacement DIY video

    jamesdc4
    __________________________________________________ ____________

    Many thanx to Aioros, Cn90, Lbert, and others who have written extensively on this topic. Their writeups gave me the courage to attempt this myself. This DIY is specifically for M54 engines (2001-2003), which have not gotten the same attention as the older M52 and have some slight differences in procedure. This procedure is only for replacement of the CCV and hoses, and is specific to the insulated variant. Note: This procedure intentionally minimizes non-essential removal of components (i.e. intake manifold, oil filter housing, etc.). While space and access is difficult, it is not impossible. Removing things like the oil filter housing can improve access. It took me over 8 hours over two days to do this job but I took my time, documented everything, took pictures and was very, very careful. Knowing what I know now and following this procedure, I can probably do it in under 3 hours now. Absolutely NO technical knowledge of BMWs or auto repair experience is required (as I have very little of either). Caution is the key as there are occasional steps where things just don’t go simply or easily. I have developed workarounds for several of those. Additional pictures are found in posts #9-#11. This procedure simply documents what I did and is for informational purposes only.

    Tools
    • T-40, T-27 & T-25 Torx
    • 6mm, 10mm, & 13mm sockets
    • Ratchet -1/4" & 3/8”
    • Extension bars, various lengths - 1/4" & 3/8”
    • Ό” drive handle
    • Small mirror (absolutely necessary!)
    • Assorted flat blade screw drivers in different lengths
    • Magnetic pick up tool (optional)
    • Small blade knife or cutter (for old hoses)
    • WD-40

    Parts
    • 11 61 7 533 400 Pressure Regulating Valve - CCV (insulated)
    • 11 61 1 533 398 Vent Pipe (insulated)
    • 11 61 7 533 399 Connecting line (insulated)
    • 11 61 7 532 629 Vent hose (insulated)
    • 11 61 7 504 536 Return Pipe (insulated)
    • 11 43 1 740 045 O-Ring, Oil Dip Stick Tube to Oil Pan

    I should’ve replaced the throttle body gasket but they didn’t have it in stock and I didn’t want to wait to button her up. Oh well! Note that the RealOEM part #6 vacuum hose is not required. In fact, the connection point on the insulated CCV is capped and hidden under the foam jacket.
    Here is what I did:

    1. Undo the long spring clip to remove the filter housing cover and and the cabin air filter. Squeeze and remove the small spring clip on the bolt at the front housing support. Remove the sensor connector and then remove the filter housing by pulling forward and store

    2. Remove the fuel rail cover by removing the (2) plastic caps and the (2) 10mm bolts underneath the caps. Remove the fuel rail cover and store.

    3. Remove the Mass Air Flow sensor (MAF) (Ref. Bentley 130-33) by disconnecting wiring harness to MAF sensor (push down the metal clip and pull the connector). Loosen the hose clamps (6mm or flat blade) between MAF and upper air intake boot and the air filter box. Remove the MAF to give you the space to remove the air filter box (next step).

    4. Remove the air filter box assembly. Detach wiring harness behind air filter box
    Remove 10mm bolt on air box base. Remove both air filter box and reassemble the MAF and air filter box as a single unit. Note the air filter box can be difficult to remove without removing the MAF because of insufficient space to pull the components apart.

    5. Remove upper air intake boot by loosening the hose clamp (6 mm or flat blade). Carefully disconnect the vent hose coming off the top of the upper air intake boot. This took me over 20 minutes of gently prying the elbow off with a screwdriver to avoid damaging the boot. Maybe I should’ve just yanked on it…

    6. Remove the lower air intake boot by loosening the two hose clamps. Some DIYs say that you must replace the lower intake boot. I didn’t want to spend the extra $35 so I was careful not to damage it during removal. Access to the second hose clamp screw requires removing a small cable support (10 mm bolt). Note that the boot has a large rubber tab at its base. This tab aligns with guides located on the throttle body port. Align the tab with the guides when reassembling.

    7. Remove the oil dipstick guide tube by cutting off CCV hose from the dipstick (it’s much easier than removing it!). Remove the 13mm bolt holding oil dip stick bracket. Disconnect a wiring bundle from the support bracket. Replace the O-ring at its base. No oil will spill as long as the oil pan is not overfilled. Insert a plug (I used tin foil) on the hole to prevent anything from falling in. Clean the guide tube going to the CCV with a flexible rod and clear with compressed air. If you drive in cold weather, you will probably find yellow-white oil condensate (“mayo”) inside this tube. This is why you are changing to the insulated CCV.

    8. Remove the wiring harness box by removing (1) 10 mm bolt and (2) 10mm nuts. One of the nuts is located at bottom right of the throttle body, next to one of the throttle body bolts. Use a mirror to view the location. The wiring harness connectors have a metal locking wire clip. Push down and pull on the connector to disconnect. To re-install, insert connector without touching metal clip until you hear it click into place. Several cables leave the front of the wiring box. Disconnect those electrical connectors that terminate toward the front to allow freedom to move the wiring box to the rear. Label all connectors to simplify reassembly. One cable has three connectors, one at the top of the radiator and the other two connectors at the front right of the radiator. Tie the two connectors together with a 24” string before you pull them to get slack. The string is so you can pull them back through when you’re done.

    9. Remove the throttle body by removing (4) 10mm bolts on the corners of the throttle body. Move it aside (to the rear) to access the CCV.

    10. Remove (2) T-25 screws that hold the CCV in place. Then cut the hoses to allow removal of the CCV. When removing the old hoses from their connection points, it is far easier to simply cut or break the old locking rings with a screwdriver than to try and squeeze the locking rings to remove them. Once the locking rings are broken, simply pull the hose off. You will find most of the hoses to be somewhat brittle, which is why you are replacing them.

    11. Warm weather uninsulated CCVs can skip this step I installed the insulated CCV and there is barely room to put it into place due to the foam insulation jacket. Since the connection to the connecting line requires that you rotate the CCV to lock the connection, I decided to modify my insulated CCV by cutting off about 1/8” of the foam jacket on the flat circular disk side of the CCV with a razor. I did not cut through the foam jacket, I just removed enough of the foam so the surface is flat (see photo). This creates enough room to rotate the CCV when in place. This makes a HUGE difference.

    12. Installing the connecting line is the most difficult. It requires you to rotate the line about 1/3 turn to lock the line onto the CCV (practice this connection process on the bench). The other hoses use the locking snap connectors that just insert and snap to lock. After trying for over 2 hours to assemble these parts in their location , I was unsuccessful and decided to modify the locking mechanism. Use a Dremel tool and a sanding cylinder to sand the two retaining ridges on the CCV nozzle smooth from about 1” long to about 1/3 inch long (see photo). This simply reduces the rotation required to lock the connecting line to about 1/8 turn (~45 degrees). Mark the spots with paint where the connecting line aligns with the CCV nozzle to aid in assembly (see photo). Insert the connecting line into the original position from above the intake manifold. Much wiggling and bending of the line is required to get it into place. Once the lower connection is in place, insert the CCV into place. Align the marks, insert the hose into the CCV and rotate the 1/8 turn. This whole process took 10 minutes (vs. over 2 hrs!) with a minimum of effort after modifying the parts! Insert the upper connection line to the engine nozzle until you hear a click. Insert the CCV screws and tighten.

    13. Remove the old hoses and install the new return pipe to the top of the engine. The other end attaches to the small branch nozzle at the top of the connecting line. Insert each hose connector onto the connecting nozzle until you hear a click.

    14. Remove the old vent pipe and insert the new vent pipe down into the same location. The 90 degree turn is at the top and the angled turn is at the bottom. Align the lower vent pipe connector to the lower CCV nozzle, insert and push until you hear the click. The upper vent pipe connection connects to the valve cover in the same way.

    15. Work backwards from Step 9 and it is clear sailing from there. When reconnecting the wiring cables, pull the string to pull the connectors out from the radiator. Be sure to route cables so they are not exposed to the fan. Make sure the right cable goes to the right connector.

    16. Prepare the oil dipstick tube by inserting the vent hose onto the branch muzzle on the dip stick tube. The vent hose does not use a locking ring and simply inserts onto the nozzle. When reinstalling the dip stick, you must make sure that the one connector that is attached to the wiring box (all others are cables exiting the wiring box) is disconnected to allow you access to reconnect the upper end of the vent hose to the bottom of the CCV. Insert the hose connector onto the CCV nozzle until it clicks.

    When I was done, there were no parts lying around (a good sign). I fired the car up, she purred like always and no CEL lights were lit. A short drive confirmed that I didn’t screw anything up. I don’t notice any difference in the way she runs but there was nothing wrong before the change. Hopefully, I won’t be blowing the black smoke that I had last winter. Hopes this helps someone who does this job on an M54.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by jamesdc4; 07-10-2011 at 09:06 PM.

  2. #2
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    Very nice!

    Jason5driver posted 02pilot's thread on his observations on the M54 CCV replacement. Great thread.
    Observations from CCV replacement on M54

    Edit: I see that 02pilot already put a link to one of his posts (in that same thread) in post #4 below.
    Last edited by jamesdc4; 11-08-2009 at 12:38 PM.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for taking the time!

  4. #4
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    Good write-up. The connection on that upper hose (the return line to the distribution rail on the intake manifold) is a pain. As I noted here: http://forums.bimmerforums.com/forum...6&postcount=20 I believe the twist-lock is to facilitate removal, not installation, and installation is achieved by press-fitting as with the other connections. Modification as you did may make things easier, though it is not strictly necessary.

  5. #5
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    I'm currently just getting started on this job and see what a pain the upper hose is going to be.

    Edit: Job is now completed...

    At first I thought, why can't you just install the upper hose onto the CCV regulator PRIOR to installation? Once I tried to remove said hose I quickly find out that it is routed between the intake duct and manifold. The upper hose must be fished into place from the top. I was able to connect the fitting by squeezing my hand in from the front by pulling the wire harness and switch off the rubber mount. Granted it WAS NOT EASY, but still clicked into place just as the other connections do. I also found by installing the lower bolt on the CCV regulator a couple threads to hold the CCV in place helped a lot. This allowed the CCV to wiggle enough to align the upper hose fitting and push it into place. After the upper hose was attached I installed the upper screw on the CCV and tightened them down. Once the regulator was being held firmly in place I was able to install the remaining hoses with relative ease.

    I did find that, on my 325i, I did not have to remove the long wire harness going over the top of the water pump. There was just enough slack to pull the junction box out of the way with the other harness unplugged. Though it has been said it is not necessary to remove the throttle body. I found it helped greatly in accessing the CCV lower screw. (I also had a leaky seal on the throttle body so it had to come off anyway.)
    Last edited by fadec; 11-22-2009 at 06:09 PM.

  6. #6
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    530i, Range Rover

    Replaced CCV + hoses on 01 E39 today

    Following the excellent DIY, I was able to to the job in about 3.5 hours of steady work. I did remove the distributor thing on the intake manifold to ease removal of the hoses. I was able to reinstall the upper hose by poking it down between the intake runners and rotating the new CCV a bit past its normal bolt hole. The hose and CCV lined up perfectly, and I used my fingertips and a long screwdriver to chase it together, then rotated the parts into their final place. Great Success!

    I did have trouble with the dipstick guide tube. It was completely clogged with "mayo" and the hose leading to it was full of oil as well. Messy. I cleaned the guide tube with brake cleaner and compressed air repeatedly, reaming it out with a coping saw blade, a rod, etc. Finally a bunch of black dusty looking stuff blew out with 120psi of shop air. Coked oil? A few more rinses with solvent and it was clean!

    I strongly recommend cleaning the guide tube, it was probably most of my CCV problem. The rest of the parts looked pretty good...
    --
    Rick

  7. #7
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    Interesting. The fact that you had the mayo accumulate, even in SoCal, indicates this problem is not limited to northern climates. Do you do a lot of short trips?

    My guide tube was relatively clean. However, ever since reinstallation, my dipstick reads about 1 quart shy. I know this because I recently replaced my oil & filter and 7 qts barely touched the lower mark on the dipstick. I have rechecked and the guide tube appears to be properly seated.

  8. #8
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    CCV Pictures

    Here are the pix that go with the DIY:


    Refer to this: http://www.realoem.com/bmw/showparts...94&hg=11&fg=15

    1 – A top shot of where the various CCV hoses go.
    2 – A view of the insulated CCV, note the foam rubber “jacket”
    3 – A view of the new CCV with the hoses attached
    4 – This is hose #2, Vent Pipe. The original is un-insulated.
    5 – This shows hose #7, Return Pipe. The original is already insulated. Note how it attaches to hose # 3, Connecting Line.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by fudman; 01-01-2010 at 12:06 PM.

  9. #9
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    6 – This is the air filter box, MAF & upper intake boot (steps 4 & 5) removed
    7 – This is engine view of the air filter box, MAF & upper intake boot (steps 4 & 5) removed
    8 – A different view of the same. Note the wiring box, dipstick tube & lower intake boot (step 6).
    9 – This shows the 13mm bolt that holds the dipstick tube (step 7).
    10 – This shows the dipstick tube removed with “mayo” inside the cut #4, Vent Hose.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
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    11 – This is where the lower intake boot has been removed.
    12 – The lower intake boot REMOVED.
    13 – A view of the original un-insulated CCV still installed. The throttle body is blocking the view.
    14 – This is the throttle body disconnected (step 9).
    15 – This is a better view of the CCV connector knurls after modification (step 12).
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #11
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    16 – The alignment stripes (step 12).
    17 – A photo of the CCV jacket modified (step 11)
    18 – The CCV just before bolting back in place (step 12)
    19 – This shows the electrical connectors tied together in Step 8.
    20 – Routing of electrical wiring (step 15).
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12
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    Official details and part numbers

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sourc...nLaxHFTEClKn3g

  13. #13
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    Just thought I would add a couple of comments of my own. I recently went to remove my oil filler cap and found it to be ceased, could not remove. I tried to remove when the engine compartment was warm and sure enough cap came off, as it was frozen on due to moisture built-up. To my surprise, the cap looked like a milkshake exploded on it. I also found a massive oil leak around the head gasket area. Of course my first thought was head gasket and huge $$$ to fix. Long story short, I took an oil sample in to have checked and sure enough, water in the oil. After reading all of the forums, I decided to spend my $2.00 for oil filter housing gasket and $180 for winter version of CCV (I'm up in Canada and we easily hit -40 Celsius in winter) and see if I could fix this problem, as I could not believe it was the head gasket. I have read many forums that say the winter version of the CCV is a pia to change, I didn't find it that hard. I took the filter housing off and sure enough, leaking like a SOB. Then started disconnecting all lines leading to CCV and guess what, water started to pour out! I also found a big hunk of ice in the line that leads to the bottom of the CCV, check out the attached pics. All-and-all both problems fixed in a few hours. I'm sure the stealer would have charged be well over $1500 to fix! One thing to watch out for on the new CCV. The insulated jacked is held together by these lame o-rings that kept coming off when trying to squeeze the CCV in place. On my 2001 530i, I DID NOT need to modify the new CCV by shaving and cutting, just have a lot of patience and a couple / few cold beers. To boot, I did this in my garage in -15c!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Kardanill; 03-13-2010 at 01:30 PM.

  14. #14
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    My perspective on this job--- BMW sucks! Sorry but this is one of the goofiest designs I ever saw right down to the winter version CCV. I bought my car original from a dealer in NJ. All my hoses and the CCV are the non-winter version but I ordered the winter version anyways. I guess the insulation is to try and keep the cold air out but if your worried about that then re-think the whole stupid thing!!If you didn't have the winter version then sure as hell don't buy it. All that foam limits how much you can move the valve and the top pipe.

    I didn't Dremel tool anything and I'm not sure if I put the hose on at 90 degrees or not but I eventually forced it on. I never heard the click but by eyeball it seems on all the way and darned if I could pull it off.

    BTW mine wasn't clogged at all with 109K miles on it. Some whitestuff a little black goo and that is it. I pulled it because I had an oil leak and when I had broken the top pipe when I changed the valve cover gasket and was spooked if I ever got the hose on correctly. Makes me wonder if the 15K oil changes help to clog it as well as the short drives because mine was pretty darn clean from comparing it with others. Oil leak is the filter housing.

    Fudman thanks for posting the DIY. For the most part I followed it but could never get the wire connector that is on the engine wedged against the overflow tank. Spent 1/2 and hour trying and then said screw it. That is part of the BMW sucks attitude I got. Most of the other connectors had the wire bail on it but the one in the most difficult spot did not. There is no room to squeeze unless you pull the overflow tank and after what it felt like taking half the right side of the motor apart , me and my back had it. I thought about squeezing the connector with channel locks but I'm sure in true BMW fashion the plastic would have broken . No room, no room , no room is essentially the deal with this job making it far worse then it should be.

    I do kind of wonder if pulling the manifold is all the more a pain. Maybe it was just my back and my cut up arms but this took a while mostly because I stopped a million times to turn this way or that and try and re-think things.
    Last edited by Cbreeze; 03-18-2010 at 06:28 PM.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 02Pilot View Post
    Good write-up. The connection on that upper hose (the return line to the distribution rail on the intake manifold) is a pain. As I noted here: http://forums.bimmerforums.com/forum...6&postcount=20 I believe the twist-lock is to facilitate removal, not installation, and installation is achieved by press-fitting as with the other connections. Modification as you did may make things easier, though it is not strictly necessary.
    Just want to reiterate this thought. I just did this job today on my 2000 528it (M52tu) and that hose WILL snap onto the valve in any orientation. As 02Pilot said, the twist lock feature is for removal, NOT installation.


    Thanks to everyone for taking the time to document their trials and tribulations with this job, it made it alot easier for me to knock this out!!

  16. #16
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    Did this job over the weekend. It can be a pain (literally, my back is killing me) but it is well worth it.

    I also suggest cleaning your ICV while you are in there. It will never be easier to get to it. And as stated before make sure you check your boots. My boot that connects to the ICV and throttle body ended up being the real culprit for my problems but I changed the CCV and cleaned the ICV while I was in there.

  17. #17
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    Wink

    Thanks, Fudman, for the comprehensive post. Gotta try this after I get the VC gasket replaced. Losing a bit of oil.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  18. #18
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    ccv oil separation valve auto-rx

    hello, i had a small amount of mayo- less than a sesame seed under oil cap, so I panicked and bought the $179-bavauto kit. I tend to be overproactive on my cars. i found some of the existing tubes to be insulated already, just not the return. what a pain in the a**. has anyone considered or used an auto-rx to dissolve mayo inside the engine? good bad or ugly? ive got 140K on a 3.0.
    I completed this , the top fitting deffinetly has to twist and lock, I fond when you are fishing it back up thru the intake manifold, there is a lot of pushing and twisting. my advice is to make sure you bring the ccv from down below the throttle body , I tried to bend and twist it into place and kept being in front of the throttle body mounting plate, at the wrong angle and couldnt ( bloody knuckles) figure out why it wouldnt fit. best of luck
    Last edited by wooded7; 03-13-2011 at 10:30 AM.

  19. #19
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    I'm in the process of changing out the CCV and step 12 was crucial for me, I wasted a lot of time trying to get the hose on with out trimming the CCV. Gave up and trimmed the CCV, after that it took me literally 5 seconds to get the hose on.

  20. #20
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    Here's a link to a DIY video posted up by mpwr ren rebel.

    BavAuto M54 CCV replacement DIY video

    I'll add this to post #1.

  21. #21
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    I had a no start problem after replacing the CCV on my 2003 530i. I spent about 4 hours troubleshooting and checking the connectors.

    I had gotten two plugs mixed up when reconnecting everything, the purge valve and the oil sensor on the back of the filter housing. Most of the plugs are keyed but two of them are interchangeable. This caused a "hidden" fuse to blow. There are five of them under the passenger side cabin air intake in a sealed box with DME. I replaced the 30 amp fuse and it started right up.

    Moral of the story, label the connectors as you unplug them!
    Brian
    2003 BMW 530i
    2002 Hyundai Elantra (beater)

  22. #22
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    94 325i, 03 530i

    wire plugs go where?

    Quote Originally Posted by radioactiveman View Post
    I had a no start problem after replacing the CCV on my 2003 530i. I spent about 4 hours troubleshooting and checking the connectors.

    I had gotten two plugs mixed up when reconnecting everything, the purge valve and the oil sensor on the back of the filter housing. Most of the plugs are keyed but two of them are interchangeable. This caused a "hidden" fuse to blow. There are five of them under the passenger side cabin air intake in a sealed box with DME. I replaced the 30 amp fuse and it started right up.

    Moral of the story, label the connectors as you unplug them!
    Hey.
    You didn't happen to have any pics or diagrams of those two, do you? I took mine apart 2 weeks ago, finally got to putting it together today, and my tag is totally smudged. (1 tag; process of elimination leaves other ID'd, right? Not. 'doh').

    Thanks in advance. Copied Fudmans' pics to drive so maybe those will help when I get back out there.

  23. #23
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    Doe the cold weather CCV come with any of the hoses? I read conflicting info around various threads, just wondering what parts to order.

  24. #24
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    I just acquired a 2005 X5 (E53) with 3.0i M54 engine...
    I am familiar with the M52 CCV which I did 6 years ago.

    I will do the CCV on the X5 soon. I am also familiar with Fudman, Jason5driver CCV DIY for M54, but this just occurred to me:
    - Since I need to replace the OFH Gasket, I am thinking once the OFH is out, I can unbolt the PS Reservoir and move it sideways.
    - Now I have access to the whole underside of Intake Manifold.

    If I approach it this way (OFH out and PS Reservoir moved sideways), I save a lot of time by not removing the Intake Manifold, which by itself a PITA job.

    Thought?

  25. #25
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    '02 530i 5 speed swap
    I just replaced mine (M54B30) and it ran with a slightly rough idle for a little bit, but it was just as bad as it was before. I'm thinking it to be the o rings on the intake manifold distribution piece (11611440318) any other things that I should be looking out for?

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