Tag Archives: diesel

Your BMW Could Be Recalled Due To A Fire Risk

BMW recently announced that it is recalling 1.6 million diesel vehicles worldwide because of potential fluid leaks that could cause fires.

The automaker said that in some diesel vehicles, the coolant glycol could leak out of the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler, which is part of the emissions reduction system. When combined with typical deposits of soot at the high temperatures that occur in the EGR module, the leaks could result in smoldering particles that could cause the intake manifold to melt “in very rare cases,” the BMW Group said in a statement. This could cause a fire “in extremely rare cases,” the company said.

BMW Concept 4 Series Coupe

The company previously recalled 480,000 vehicles in Asia and Europe in mid-August after fires were reported in South Korea. In August, the South Korean government banned owners of affected vehicles from driving them until they could be inspected after videos of BMW vehicles on fire went viral in the country. The company also faced a class-action lawsuit from customers that alleged that BMW did not respond promptly to the fires, which led to an investigation by the government. Police raided the automaker’s office in Seoul. In response, BMW said it would pick up the cars banned from being driven, provide rental cars to customers and conduct the necessary inspections. No injuries were reported related to the incidents.

Following the driving ban in South Korea, the BMW Group conducted further examinations of vehicles with engines with similar setups. The company then announced the ban for Asia and Europe. On October 23, BMW said it would expand its recall to cover a total of 1.6 million vehicles worldwide, including around 54,700 vehicles in the U.S and Canada. The announcement includes some vehicles made between August 2010 and August 2017. As part of the technical campaign, the company said it would check the EGR modules and replace any faulty components in all potentially affected vehicles.

The global recall is voluntary. The BMW Group said that it did not find any significant risks to customers in its recent examinations.

“Nonetheless the BMW Group decided to further reduce even this minor risk by expanding the country-specific technical campaigns. It is the goal of BMW Group to support the trust and confidence of our customers in our products,” the BMW Group said.

BMW said that it would contact customers with affected cars. Customers can also check for recalls that apply to their vehicle by entering the last seven numbers of their vehicle identification number (VIN) on the BMW website. Additionally, customers can contact BMW or their local dealer with questions and concerns.

BMW also recently recalled approximately 2,600 2016-17 BMW M3 sedans, 2016-17 M4 and M4 GTS coupes and 2017 M4 convertibles because of a potentially faulty connection between the flange and driveshaft. A failed connection could result in a loss of propulsion and increased crash risk. BMW will notify owners, and dealers will replace the driveshaft at no cost to the customer.

Why BMW Is Ceasing the Production of Diesel Cars in the U.S.

Diesel cars have been a major part of the BMW lineup since they were introduced in the 1980s as a response to the oil crisis of the late 1970s. The design celebrated its 35th anniversary this year, which makes BMW’s decision to stop producing diesel cars in the United States all the more surprising.

Why is the German car giant ditching it’s diesel engines, and what will be appearing in its place?

Dropping Sales and Emissions Concerns

The demand for diesel cars has been declining in recent years, even in Europe, where they’ve been so popular until now. European diesel sales are expected to drop to 5 percent of new car sales by 2030, and in the United States, diesel sales have suffered in the wake of the Volkswagen emissions scandal of 2017.

Volkswagen was found guilty of modifying their diesel car’s emissions systems so that they would appear to pass emissions tests, but it was actually generating more CO2 and other emissions than was legal. It resulted in a massive recall, and only 222 Volkswagen diesel vehicles were sold in January of that year. The year before, January sales were nearly 4500.

The Rise of the Plug-In Hybrid


2018 will mark the end of BMW’s diesel line in the United States. That means some models, like the 540d xDrive, will only be available in the States for a single year.

This doesn’t mean the BMW model line will be shrinking dramatically, though — in spite of the rather abrupt announcement, the manufacturer has also announced it will be releasing several plug-in hybrids to replace the diesel models being removed from the lineup.

These may end up being a better idea for BMW in the long run, especially in North America, where eco-minded drivers are giving up their gas-guzzling cars in favor of hybrid or electric alternatives.

BMW isn’t the only manufacturer jumping on the green energy bandwagon. GM is planning on eventually phasing out all of its gasoline-powered vehicles sometime in the future, but will be introducing at least 20 totally electric models by 2023. Ford is planning on launching 13 new electric or hybrid models in the same timeline. Volvo is planning on rolling out electric cars for its entire line as early as next year.

2014 BMW All-Electric i3 Press Drive.


Replacing its diesel models with plug-in hybrids might be one of the smartest things BMW has done in a long time.

Industry experts haven’t released any information yet about the exact specs of the new hybrids, though they probably won’t be ready to roll out for the 2019 model year. For drivers who have their hearts set on owning a new diesel BMW, only a few are left on the showroom floors, but they won’t be there for long.

New hybrids might be changing the face of the BMW lineup, but they definitely won’t be sacrificing their luxurious designs in favor of better gas mileage. New information will hopefully be available at the end of this year or the beginning of 2019.