How to Fix Your BMW’s Windshield

Bimmers are famous for masking speed, a major factor in the unfair reputation BMW owners get for always pushing the pace in traffic. We’re not here to pass judgment about your driving habits, but if you’re going to explore the upper registers of the speedometer, we recommend making sure you have good visibility. That means keeping your windshield well maintained.

Windshield repair and replacement can be an expensive operation, and even more expensive if you don’t know what you’re doing. It’s highly recommended to do this at a shop and let the professionals do it. However, if you have plenty of experience with other repairs, you could give it a shot.

When to Make a Repair

Sometimes windshield damage can appear minor and then propagate. You can probably drive your BMW following minor window damage, but it’s best to act quickly to avoid the risk that the crack will spread. It might take some time to do, but if you don’t make proper repairs it can lead to a very unsafe driving situation.

Removing a Damaged Windshield

As with many premium brands, BMW repairs can have strangely high prices even when the work is the same for your car as the average econobox. Removing a windshield is one of these cases. So again, this can be pretty expensive if you make a mistake, which is why it’s usually better to go to a pro.

Begin by removing plastic trim and molding around the windshield using a pry tool, being careful not to damage your BMW’s finish. With this complete, use a cold knife or razor and separate the window glass and body. Cut the urethane from inside the vehicle to avoid breaking glass. Do as little damage to the pinch weld where glass and body material meet as possible.

Prepping for the Install

With your damaged windshield removed, clean the open pinch weld where the glass seats in the body. Remove any excess urethane. Add tape to any exposed metal that is not sanded, and then apply primer to the bare metal in several thin coats. This will encourage the frit band on your new BMW windshield to seat properly.

Finally, use a caulk gun to apply new urethane around the entire pinch weld. While you can use a manual gun, we recommend using an electric one to get a consistent seal and avoid air bubbles that could result in a leak down the road.

Seat the New Windshield

You’re nearly finished. With help from a friend, carefully align the new windshield with the pinch weld. Some windshield glass will include mounting blocks that will help guide you. Avoid touching the frit band, as oils from your skin will contaminate the bond between your glass and the car’s body.

You may have seen tape around the windshield of cars that have had glass replaced. This is one technique you can use to help support the glass until the urethane dries. The last step is to remove any old windshield clips and push a new gasket into place. Replace the trim around the glass, and you’re good to go.

Nice work! The price of a new BMW windshield install can exceed $1,100 in many cases, so treat yourself to a beer.

Keep Senior Drivers on the Road Safe: Drive Reliable Cars

Keep Senior Drivers on the Road Safe: Drive Reliable Cars

Dependable cars can help elderly drivers stay safe while on the road. As people age, physical and mental changes occur. Eye sights fail, reaction time diminishes and physical capability wanes. Statistics show that although elderly people are safer drivers because they observe speed limits, wear seatbelts and are not likely to drink and drive compared to other age groups, the probability that they suffer injuries and even die due to crashes is high because of aging vulnerabilities. These include bone fragility and medical conditions that make it difficult for the elderly drivers to recover from injuries after an accident. The stats are grim with 5,700 lives claimed and 236,000 injuries among senior drivers in 2014, according to the CDC and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (2016).

Preventing Deaths and Injuries Among Elderly Drivers

In 2015, there are over 40 million senior drivers in the US which represents a 50% increase compared to 1999 (US Department of Transportation Highway Statistics, 1999 and 2015). Given the high incidence of deaths and injuries among elderly drivers, there are some steps that can be taken to prevent these from happening. One is to make sure that medical conditions are managed including updating of prescription medications to minimize side effects. Eye sight must be checked at regular intervals and glasses or corrective lenses should be renewed. Other preventive measures that can be taken include planning routes, avoiding distractions and observing good driving practices (no tailgating, talking on the phone or listening to loud radio).

Driving a Safe Car

In addition, keeping vehicles maintained properly and serviced regularly will help in keeping seniors safe while driving. It is also of benefit if elderly people have a car that is technically sound. AAA reports indicate that an ideal car for a senior is something that is easy to get in and out of, while being comfortable. These cars must have safety features that are easy to use and activate. BMW, for instance is a respected brand when it comes to safety. Part of the success of BMW is that it offers several models for the customers to choose from. From active cameras helping drivers park seamlessly and lights that provide enough illumination, there is a make that suits senior drivers. In the future, the BMW brand will put self-driving cars on the road. When that day comes, there is no reason why seniors are not going to stay safe while driving on the road.

New BMW 5-series Review on Road and Track

By Mitchell Weitzman

“They’re doing a 5-series event at an F1 track?” Was my first thought of BMW’s Back to the Track event, starring the new G30 coded 5-series, at, yep, the Circuit of the Americas, a full-blown Formula 1 race circuit. This isn’t for a new M5. It could be out of it’s element I thought, why not have this in Palm Springs or Miami? Nope, COTA will suffice.

Now for the real fun. BMW invited out some talent out to show us a good time, in the form of Adam Andretti, yes, one of those Andretti’s, overall Le Mans winner Davy Jones, former F1, INDYCAR, and CART driver Roberto Guerrero, do-it-all open-wheel and sportscar man Shane Donley, and legendary track day instructor and racer Mark Wolocatiuk. Their mission? Drive as hard as possible and as close as possible.

So there I was, on a plane to Austin, Texas to drive the new 5 series. I want the new 5 to be good, of course. As comfortable as it was, I was always underwhelmed by the prior 5er, favoring older models in its stead, finding it somewhat boring with little engagement.

So what has changed? It’s a new chassis featuring lighter metals like aluminum and magnesium (no Carbon Core present here), and the new engine family migrated over from the 330i and 340i. There are several autonomous features as well. One such is a lane assistant that will keep the car in your lane providing micro steering adjustments as it scans for visible lane markings and hooks up to following the car in front. When coupled with adaptive cruise control, which will brake and slow down to a complete stop if the car in front does, and then speed back up to your set speed; It’s the closest to autonomy this side of a Tesla. There’s even a ‘display’ key that looks like an old small phone with a tiny touchscreen. With the right package, you can tell the car to pull into or out of a parking spot while standing beside the car, mostly for showing off to your friends. Gesture controls have been passed down from big brother 7 as well. I don’t see the practical use of them as it means taking your hands off the wheel, but I’m sure your date and her friends will be impressed. My favorite tech comes in the form of a 360-degree camera with many many viewing angles. Honestly, there is no excuse anymore for curbing a wheel here. And of course, none of this is standard.It has simply become a tech lover’s delight. Continue reading New BMW 5-series Review on Road and Track

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